Circuit load calculation

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Old 08-01-06, 08:35 AM
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Circuit load calculation

I've calculated the load that I will have on a circuit, and just wanted to post it here for confirmation.
It is a 15 amp circuit, 14-2 wire feed.

I have, on this circuit:
porch light 1 75W
porch light 2 75W
bedroom fan w/ light 100W
dining room light 100 W

And will be replacing kitchen light with recessed lights, totalling
350W (7 @ 50W each), as well as replacing a kitchen hood exhaust fan (new fan listed as 120V, 60Hz, 1.8 amps, calculated to 216W (I think?)

With 1440W being the max, I come in at 916W

Am I ok on this circuit?

Brian
 
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Old 08-01-06, 09:06 AM
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This is a 15 amp Branch-Circuit with liting outlets and possibly "general-purpose" receptacle outlets. "General-purpose" receptacles are those that supply power to cord-connected loads in bedrooms and living rooms-- loads such as table and floor lamps, radios, phonographs, and very small "intermittent" motor-loads such as a vacuum cleaner.

The "rule of thumb" for such a B-C is 1.5 amps-per-outlet, either a liting outlet or a receptacle outlet, so 10 outlets on a 15 amp B-C would be the extent of the circuit.

Good Luck ,& Learn & Enjoy from the Experience!!!
 
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Old 08-01-06, 09:14 AM
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While Pat's rule of thumb is a good rule, it really does not apply here. You have all known loads, so you simply add them up as you have done. You do not have any receptacles.

However, you do not add the loads as you have plan to run them (specific light bulb size), you add the loads based on the maximum per outlet, or location. Based on the fixture ratings, add the maximum size light bulb that can be installed in each location.

If you are still within the maximum for the circuit, then you are okay. If you fall outside this range then you probably should split the circuit.
 
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Old 08-01-06, 10:06 AM
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I got 991 watts total which is still within your budgit amps which are correct. This is great as you will surely replace that 100 watt dining room light with a better chandleere in the near future. sorry spelling.
 
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Old 08-01-06, 10:37 AM
ddr
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bedroom fan w/ light 100W
I'm assuming the bulb is 100 watts by itself? If so, don't forget to add in the load of the fan, too. If the 100 watts includes everything, sorry about butting in; just wanted to make sure you have the right load.
 
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Old 08-01-06, 10:46 AM
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I will have to check on the ceiling fan, but otherwise everything stated was max for each. Thanks for the help!
 
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Old 08-01-06, 11:26 AM
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Bob, your point is well recieved, but it may help Brian to know he can, if necessary, connect general-purpose receptacle outlets to the circuit he is designing.
 
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Old 08-01-06, 12:45 PM
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Why not go ahead and run12/2,, stick it on a 20 Amp breaker,, (just in case) you decide while your running your circuit,, that you might like a outlet somewhere.
 
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