Old house, new electric.

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  #1  
Old 08-01-06, 10:05 PM
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Old house, new electric.

My house has 60 amp service, the attached appartment has 100 amp. I have re wired everything to romex (12.-2) . My problem is that for the dryer, basement and two Air conds I had to add them to the appartment panel as mine is very overloaded . Now i am looking to install 200 amp in my house and put all my junk on my box, so the tenant can pay his own darn bill . I have the panel now, i want to basically install the panel and and do the connections myself, would it be possible to just have the electrican run the new wire form the pole to my new meter then into my new panel to the main . One the wire is attached to the main breaker and buss'es I can shut it off and do my own work . Will they do this ? I wil be breaking up circuits so will do the breaker instals and such and i want to save some money . any input?
 
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Old 08-02-06, 05:28 AM
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You may have a tough time finding an electrician who will only install the new panel and leave the circuit wires unattached. Most electricians prefer not to do part of a job, especially one like this that requires an inspection when complete.

Generally speaking, the utility runs the wire from the pole to the house. At that point you (as owner) are responsible for running wire to the meter and to the panel.

I suggest that you call a few electricians and speak with them, but don;t be surprised if it's all or nothing.

One other comment. Replacing the panel requires that the panel be properly grounded to today's code. The grounding for the old panel may not be up to date.
 
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Old 08-02-06, 01:13 PM
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Where I live the utility runs the cable from the pole to the meter, and the electrician handles things from there. Have you checked on this with your power supplier?

If you have no luck finding someone who will do part of the job, get a quote for the minimum work which would probably do two main things: 1) Turn your present 60A service panel into a junction box and 2) Provide new feeds from the new 200A load center to the "junction box". After that's done you can reroute at your leisure, more or less, within the requirements of the local code.

Also talk to the utility about an overhead to underground conversion. It costs more but then you don't have to worry about running into those wires with your ladders and kites.

Another thing to consider is a new meter pedestal or box that has a customer-accessible shutoff so you can completely de-energize your 200A panel for maintenance. That would be nice if you wanted to transition gradually and don't want to hassle with covering the main breaker lugs while you're pulling wire into the panel.
 
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Old 08-02-06, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by ArgMeMatey
Another thing to consider is a new meter pedestal or box that has a customer-accessible shutoff so you can completely de-energize your 200A panel for maintenance. That would be nice if you wanted to transition gradually and don't want to hassle with covering the main breaker lugs while you're pulling wire into the panel.
I've got a question about this exact same thing. I don't mind doing wiring work in my electrical panel, but I'm always concerned about the live lugs at the top of the panel. Is there a decent way of covering them up to prevent accidentally coming into contact with them? I've always thought this is something that should be done on every meter - a way to disconnect the power outside the house, before the service panel.
 
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Old 08-02-06, 06:14 PM
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Where I work at its 3 days off for working on a hot panel,, but hey,, you have to (troubleshoot) live circuits sometimes,,, but to answer your question,, I know of no 100% safe way to protect yourself from the main lugs,, other then de-energizing it.,, I made a screwdriver into molten metal by (accidently) grounding it from the main to ground,, it wasent pretty,,
 
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Old 08-02-06, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by swallman
I'm always concerned about the live lugs at the top of the panel. Is there a decent way of covering them up to prevent accidentally coming into contact with them?
I took a round piece of plastic (a clear lid from a bird food bucket about 10" diameter) and cut it to fit around the wires from the service entrance cable. I wrap it around the main breaker and tape it in place. I know it's not tested for dielectric properties but it keeps the stray fishtape or screwdriver away.

Maybe somebody makes something like this for pros. If so can someone more knowledgeable post a link? Thanks.
 
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Old 08-02-06, 07:08 PM
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I only need him to get the wire hooked onto the new panel mains while it is off . I can mount the panel and ground it and do the rest but i just can't do the pole to house connection obviously.
 
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Old 08-02-06, 11:17 PM
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PC does the house to pole connection. At least that is the way it was for georgia power. For an overhead connection you had to have cable from the meter base to the weather head. They would connect the wire inside the meter base and to their cable at the weather head. Check with power company to see what is required. They will want 2 0r three feet of wire hanging out the weather head. They'll want the ground rod installed and they may check the ground resistance for you. Last time I had this done they checked the ground by connecting a fuse from the hot line to ground and if the fuse blew you were good. Georgia Power used to have a pamphlet on this because so much of there hookups were rural and not subject to inspection.
 
 

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