Connecting a pony box to panel

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  #1  
Old 08-07-06, 09:04 PM
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Connecting a pony box to panel

I have recently purchased a hot tub. I also bought a 60 amp GFCI that came with a pony box.

I have installed the pony box beside my main panel, installed the breaker in the pony box, and run 6 ga TECK cable from the tub site into the house, and connected it to the breaker.

My question is how do I connect the pony box to the main panel? Obviously I have to run cable from the pony box to the main panel. The pony box side is easy, there are two terminals, one for each hot (as it is 240V), another for the neutral and another for the ground. My question is, where do I make the connections in the main panel? I don't see anywhere obvious.

thanks in advance, Max
 
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  #2  
Old 08-08-06, 02:52 AM
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The neutral and ground stay seperate in the pony box, or sub panel. They go to the same neutral/ground bar in the main panel. If the neutrals and grounds are seperate in the main panel it is not really the main, and the main is outside so you would keep them seperate here as well.

You need to install a breaker for the two hot legs.
 
  #3  
Old 08-08-06, 05:34 AM
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I am not familiar with the term TECK cable. Please describe this. Also, is the hot tub inside or outside? From your description, it sounds like it is outside.

If it is outside, then you need to relocate the panel. The hot tub panel (or at least a disconnect for the tub) needs to be outside near the tub. You also need a regular 120 volt receptacle nearby for "convenience" use.

There are many other rules for hot tubs that must be complied with, including proper bonding of the tub and any nearby metal.

Electricity and water do not mix. Electricity can and does kill people.

Please consider hiring an electrician so that this job is done properly.
 
  #4  
Old 08-08-06, 12:14 PM
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TECK, in Canada anyways, is more or less an MC type cable that is covered in weatherproof plastic.
 
  #5  
Old 08-08-06, 11:12 PM
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Thanks to all who answered.

To jwhite, yes I know to keep the ground and neutral separate in the subpanel, the GFCI came with very clear installation instructions. I am not quite sure what you mean though when you say "If the neutrals and grounds are seperate in the main panel it is not really the main, and the main is outside so you would keep them seperate here as well."

I wasn't sure if I needed to install another breaker and then run the hots from that breaker to the GFCI breaker, or if there was somewhere else to connect the wires to in the main panel. So the juice does in fact have to go through two breakers before it gets to the tub.

To racraft, the tub IS indeed outside. I am not sure if the requirement for a disconnect to be near the tub is a local requirement in your area or not, I will look into that.

To me I would be more nervous having the breaker outside than inside, where it is protected from the weather. If it does indeed have to be outside, all I need to do is turn the box around 180 degrees so the door of the subpanel faces the outside wall, not the inside wall. I purposely positioned the tub to be on the same wall as the panel to make wiring as straightforward as possible.

I just poured a new concrete patio for the tub to sit on so there is NO metal anywhere near it.

I personally know (knew) two people who have been electrocuted, so I am quite aware of electricity's potential. Thanks for the advice. As far as hiring an electrician, it is ( in my mind ) a relatively simple procedure, I was just not sure if I had to use another breaker or if there were some other leads somewhere in my panel that I could not see. Also, everyone is so busy here it would probably take a couple of weeks to get anyone out here to look at it, and I just want to get the job done.

Again, thanks for the advice. I will purchase another breaker, and check into the requirements for placement of the GFCI.
 
  #6  
Old 08-09-06, 05:14 AM
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If you are in Canada then you need to check laws for Canada.

In the US, Hot tubs outside require a convenience receptacle near the tub. There are distances for placement for this receptacle that must be followed. The disconnect MUST be outside near the tub. Again, there are specific distances that MUST be maintained.

Please consider a professional for this installation. Your questions and your lack of knowledge of local laws indicate that you probably will get some part of the installation wrong.
 
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