Recessed light installation ran into coax cable

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  #1  
Old 08-11-06, 07:26 PM
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Recessed light installation ran into coax cable

I am installing some recessed lights in a room I don't have access to from above. After testing the locations for my new lights, I removed the sheetrock only to find a piece of coax cable running right through the center of my rough opening (the wire I used to test the cut before making it missed the coax). What can I do? There isn't enough slack in the coax to move it forward or back. Is it possible to cut the coax and re-splice? How difficult is that with only a 7" hole in the ceiling? Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 08-11-06, 09:15 PM
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TV cable ?

sure , cut it and splice a peice in , use barrell connectors to join it all up.

I would use compression fittings rather than crimp and whatever you do dont use screw on .

might be just as cheap to have somebody do it for you unless you have other uses for the compression tool
 
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Old 08-11-06, 09:49 PM
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are you sure that the coax is even being used for anything? I've got so much random coax in my house it's ridiculous. My theory is every time new cable and/or satellite was installed, the company ran new coax rather than figure out what it was for.

You might try cutting the wire then checking all TV's. If you haven't lost anything, no need to do anything else. If one of your TV's is out after cutting it, see if it would be easier just to re-run a new piece of coax. I just don't like splicing coax, I've always seemed to lose quality. If splicing is your only option, you might consider adding an in-line amplifier while you have it cut.
 
  #4  
Old 08-12-06, 07:39 AM
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I just don't like splicing coax, I've always seemed to lose quality. If splicing is your only option, you might consider adding an in-line amplifier while you have it cut.
which is way I suggest having a pro do it , crimp can be difficult , compression is the way to go , there are cheap compression tools ..30 range the one I use was 90 .00

a compression fitting will do far more than a poor crimp with a amp.
 
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