sub-panel install

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  #1  
Old 08-13-06, 05:45 AM
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sub-panel install

Need some help Please. I have a detached garage and want to have a sub-panel installed. Here's my plan. 60 amp bkr at main,
triplex 2-2-3 in 2" pvc 24" deep through only lawn 45' away.
Sub-panel unobstructed in garage 48" from grade. Grd rod at
garage with separate neutral and ground at sub.

Anything wrong
Twodogs
 
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  #2  
Old 08-13-06, 05:53 AM
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If you are going to the trouble of running conduit, then run individual conductors in the conduit.

With three conductors, the neutral and ground must be connected at the sub panel. With four conductors they remain isolated. I recommend four, even if you can legally use three.
 
  #3  
Old 08-13-06, 05:53 AM
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Are there now, or will there ever be any other metal paths between the two buildings. Water, gas, phone, CATV etc.??
 
  #4  
Old 08-13-06, 05:57 AM
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Originally Posted by jwhite
Are there now, or will there ever be any other metal paths between the two buildings. Water, gas, phone, CATV etc.??

Doubtful but possible
 
  #5  
Old 08-13-06, 06:43 AM
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What you are discribing is legal as long as you bond the neutrals and grounds at the sub panel. You also need to use a main breaker panel at the garage or install a disconnect.

Since you are using a 60 amp breaker, number 2 is overkill but not illegal. Depending on what you will be using in the garage it may be nice to have some room for voltage drop.

I am with racraft in reccomending that you pull a full size ground even for the just in case you want to put a phone or tv out there sometime in the future. In this case you still need the main disconnect at the garage, and the ground rod, but you will keep the grounds and neutrals seperate.

If you go with the aluminum conductors I would use number 4 for the hots and neutral and number 8 for the ground. I would not derate the neutral since you are not likely to be using alot of 240 volt loads. The neutral is likely to be carrying the same current as hots at any given point in time and you will have less wories about load balancing. You will need number 6 copper to the ground rod.

I didnt look just now, but I beleive that the 2 inch pvc is large enough, and I would run a 1 inch empty conduit for the future telephone/catv line that you are not currently planning to install. The conduit is cheap, and the labor to dig a ditch is large. This can be in the same ditch no clearance is required from the electrical conduit.
 
  #6  
Old 08-12-07, 03:24 AM
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Originally Posted by jwhite View Post
I didnt look just now, but I beleive that the 2 inch pvc is large enough, and I would run a 1 inch empty conduit for the future telephone/catv line that you are not currently planning to install. The conduit is cheap, and the labor to dig a ditch is large. This can be in the same ditch no clearance is required from the electrical conduit.
could you run the phone line in the same conduit as your wire.
My first home was that way. never seemed to be problem
 
  #7  
Old 08-12-07, 04:40 AM
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No, you cannot run phone wire, or any low voltage wire (television, computer, etc.) in the same conduit as electrical cable. You are not allowed (by code) to do so.

You don't want to either. The interference caused by the electric wires will be an issue.
 
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