New outlet in the bathroom

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  #1  
Old 08-14-06, 11:26 AM
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New outlet in the bathroom

I have done a little research on this issue, but have reached a snag. First some background information.

I want to install a new outlet in the bathroom. The current outlet is on the opposite wall and I am trying to avoid tearing up that much drywall. (By the way I am in Chicago and I know this has an effect on code. The building is three years old) The other two options I think I have:

The Light switch on the same wall

Problems: It has three switches in the box already (two to lights one to a fan) Additionally, the circuit is to all of the lights in the bathroom (three sets, the fan, and the ceiling fan and three lights in the bedroom).

An outlet in the bedroom (same wall) between the same two studs where I want to put the new outlet. This circuit is only to outlets in the bedroom next to the bathroom and the one down the hall. These outlets are not utilized very often. The circuit has an AFCI test on it. IT has 12 wire and a 20 amp circuit.

The Problem: The wiring in the outlet is odd. It is not the end of the circuit. Additionally, there are not two sets of wires in the box. Instead the electrician/builder just cut off the insulation and looped the wires around the screws. (As a side note, he wired this particular outlet with neutral and hot backwards, which I have fixed and the outlet is a 15 amp outlet). This means that the two other screws one hot and one neutral are left open. There is no ground wire, but from what I have researched the conduit needed in Chicago provides the ground? Can I run the new outlet from these two open screws? Can I even attach the new outlet from this old outlet?

Suggestions about either option would be appreciated. I am planning on repainting and repairing the walls in the bathroom if that provides me with unique options. Sorry about the long post.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-14-06, 11:38 AM
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You cannot tap a receptacle in a bedroom. You cannot tap the lights in the bathroom. Do not go any further trying to figure out if you can use either of these sources, you cannot.

You MAY be able to tap the existing receptacle in the bathroom, if it serves nothing else except this bathroom, or if it serves only receptacles in bathrooms.

Chicago requires conduit be used. This makes the job harder, but not impossible. In some ways it may be easier.
 
  #3  
Old 08-14-06, 11:46 AM
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I am assuming it is the code that will not let me tap the bedroom.

The other receptacle is on the other far wall and appears to be on its own circuit (I have not found anything else connected to it in a pretty thorough search.

The building is a condo so I have no access to an attic or basement for the wiring. Is it okay to cut into the studs and run conduit around two walls? Addtionally, because of the tub and the sink in the way, is it possible to run the conduit towards the ceiling instead of the floor?

Thanks for any help.
 
  #4  
Old 08-14-06, 11:58 AM
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You may not "cut into the studs" or the ceiling joists, but you may drill holes in them and run conduit through them. The holes have to be in the center of the studs or the joists.

I am not real familiar with Chicago rules, so I cannot help you with what type of conduit is required.

Yes, it is the NEC (National Electrical Code) that won't allow you to tap the bedroom circuit. A circuit serving bathroom receptacles may serve only receptacles in one or more bathrooms, or it may server receptacles and other loads (lights, exhaust fan) in a single bathroom.

If this existing bathroom receptacle is on it's own circuit then you can extend it to other receptacles in the bathroom. Note that it must be GFCI protected, which can be done via a GFCI breaker or by using a GFCI receptacle.
 
  #5  
Old 08-14-06, 12:11 PM
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Thanks for all of your help. I do have a few more questions.

After your last comment, I checked the circuit it also runs to the other bathrooms outlet. The bathroom I want to add the outlet in appears to be the end of the circuit (only one set of wires). Can I still tap into this circuit?

Finally, does the code specify where in the wall the conduit has to be run? Can I run it near the ceiling instead of the floor?
 
  #6  
Old 08-14-06, 12:29 PM
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As long as the circuit serves nothing but bathroom receptacles you are okay.

For reference, receptacles means devices that accept a plug from a cord and plug. Outlets means much more, so you need to use the term receptacles when you mean receptacles and outlets when you mean receptacles, lights and anything else.

The conduit can be run in the ceiling or anywhere in the wall.
 
  #7  
Old 08-14-06, 12:45 PM
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Thank you very much. I will update if I decide to tackle running the conduit.
 

Last edited by whitesox78; 08-14-06 at 02:25 PM.
  #8  
Old 08-16-06, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft
Yes, it is the NEC (National Electrical Code) that won't allow you to tap the bedroom circuit. A circuit serving bathroom receptacles may serve only receptacles in one or more bathrooms, or it may server receptacles and other loads (lights, exhaust fan) in a single bathroom.
Just out of curiosity, what possible reason could there be for such a rule?
 
  #9  
Old 08-16-06, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by md2lgyk
Just out of curiosity, what possible reason could there be for such a rule?
Hair dryers, and curling irons.
 
  #10  
Old 08-16-06, 05:08 PM
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Just out of curiosity, what possible reason could there be for such a rule?[/

Whats up with the conduit in resi work?
Is flex allowed?
Then you can't cut studds or joists!?
Does some politician have stock in the elec fitting industry?
I thought Massachusetts was out of its mind, (We are but not in this respect)
 
  #11  
Old 08-21-06, 06:05 AM
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I think the requirement to use conduit goes back to when there were problems with rodents gnawing into the wires. Maybe Chicago has more rats than other places LOL.
 
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