GFI Outlet problems

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  #1  
Old 08-15-06, 03:21 PM
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GFI Outlet problems

I have a GFI outlet outside, which has my dishwasher on the same circuit. I never have any problems with it during the summer, but during the winter, the dishwasher will often trip the circuit at a certain point in it's cycle (but not right away). The GFI doesn't always reset... the button will push in for a moment, and as soon as the electrical load is resumed it trips again.

The outlet is far enough above grade that it is not in the snow and should not directly be getting wet.

I have read some conflict opinions on whether or not GFI outlets expire or not. I can change the outlet now, but won't know whether or not it works for a few months... just easier to change it now.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-15-06, 03:26 PM
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Yes, GFCI outlets, as with any other device, if carrying a load will get "tired". Change this device with a new one. with the power OFF. Then run a new feed to your dishwasher, This motor will wear it out again and again.
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-15-06 at 04:32 PM. Reason: Removed quote as it's unnecessary to quote the entire post above
  #3  
Old 08-15-06, 03:51 PM
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I would also put an "in use" GFCI cover over it to eliminate the possibility of snow getting it wet. Moisture has a way with GFCI's also, so an ounce of prevention.....besides, it's code.
 
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Old 08-15-06, 03:59 PM
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I recommend that you change the wiring so that the GFCI does not protect the dishwasher. A dishwasher does not need to be, and many would say should not be, on a GFCI.
 
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Old 08-15-06, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by chandler
I would also put an "in use" GFCI cover over it to eliminate the possibility of snow getting it wet. Moisture has a way with GFCI's also, so an ounce of prevention.....besides, it's code.
Have you not found these to be the most UN-USEFULL things ever invented ?
All they do is put extra stress on the cords plugged into them, then the home owner finds them to be a PAIN in the #@@ and then they break and now you have NO protection. Appears to be a "Feel Good" answer to an age old question.
 
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Old 08-16-06, 04:59 AM
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I agree. They are cute, and someone made a mint when they talked the NEC to adopt them, but only takes a flick of a frustrated owner's wrist to eliminate the cap, and then the fun begins. "My outlet keeps on tripping". Well, duh.
Some of the contractors here are using the, what I call, tack on boxes. From the finished siding the gray box sticks out 2 inches, then the clear cover another 3 inches, so they look like warts on a frog's rear end. Why not plan for this when you install your initial boxes, and just leave the cover off until punch out?
 
  #7  
Old 08-16-06, 11:19 AM
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Thanks so much. There is a sealed cover over the outlet currently, and it really hasn't gotten wet at all. Rather then run a separate line to the dishwaser, would the coverage on the circuit change if i change the order... send the wire first to the dishwasher and then to the outlet rather then the other way around? Does the GFI cover the entire circuit both up and down stream or just downstream?

There are really only a couple other outlets which are rarely used on this circuit, so don't know that i'd want to go to all the effort of putting in a new line just for the dishwasher.
 
  #8  
Old 08-16-06, 11:28 AM
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A GFCI rec willl only have ground fault protection at its face, where you plug things in, and on anything connected to it's LOAD terminals. It has no effect on anything between it and the panel.

A dishwasher should be on its own circuit regardless. I dont care what it draws.

The nature of you questions suggests that you do not understand the basic concepts needed to do electrical work safely. Get a book and do some reading on the subject before you attempt any more work. Until you understand the basics, you will never be able to understand the more detailed stuff involved in answering your questions on a web forum.
 
  #9  
Old 08-16-06, 11:31 AM
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My suggestion was not to remove or rerun any wires, although I do feel a dishwasher should not be on a circuit serving the outside.

I suggest that you redo the CONNECTIONS at the GFCI so that the dishwasher is not GFCI protected.
 
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Old 08-16-06, 12:14 PM
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Ok. Thank you. I understand what everyone is saying. I agree that its not exactly how i would like to have it wired, its just the way it was when i bought the house. Since i don't plan on being here for a whole lot longer, i don't see the return on my time in running a new line for the outlets, even if that would be the most proper thing to do.

Thanks again
 
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