Dryer electric question


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Old 08-16-06, 09:22 AM
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Question Dryer electric question

Yes, I know this question should be over in the household section. Actually it already is and I was told to post my question here too.

My question is this: In my laundry room I need to move the dryer from its current location to a new location so I can vent it outside. Right now it is venting into the house. Anyway, when I move the dryer it will be about 10-12 feet away from the outlet. The longest premade cable that I can find is only 6 feet long. Would it be ok for me to go to the hardware store and purchase some new cable (12 foot of it) and make myself a new cable for the dryer? The other thing is that most of the bulk cable that the hardware stores sell is a 4 wire in the same gauge and my dryer is only a 3 wire. Is it ok to use the 4 wire and not connect the 4th wire?

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 08-16-06, 09:29 AM
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The cords are only six feet maximum because electrical codes will not allow the applaince to be more than six feet from the receptacle. You cannot use a 4 wire plug on a three wire circuit. IMO your only code compliant choice is to extend the 3 wire circuit or better run a new 4 wire circuit for the dryer.
The only way you can extend the existing 3 wire circuit is with the approval of your local building department in terms of legality. Some juristictions will let you extend 3 wires and some will not.

The extension cord is a bad idea.

Roger
 
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Old 08-16-06, 10:04 AM
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This presumes the dryer is electric.

For Code-compliant Grounding connections, you need to examine the type of cable that extends from the panel to the existing location of the dryer.The cable could be Non-metallic with 3 insulated #10 conductors and a bare Grounding Conductor, or a metallic, "Armored" cable with 3 insulated conductors enclosed in a metal seath.

If you have one of these two types of cable, you can extend the wiring using a Code- approved Wiring Method (WM) between the old/new dryer connection points.

One possible WM is PVC conduit enclosing 3 #10 Black/Red/White conductors, and a #10 Green Equiptment Grounding Conductor. The new conductors in the PVC conduit would connect to the existing conductors in a "deep" "4-11/16"
metallic outlet-box.

But before this is decided, it's necessary to exactly determine if the existing cable provides the required Equiptment Grounding Conductor.

Good Luck, & Learn & ENjoy from the Experience!!!
 
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Old 08-16-06, 10:06 AM
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More bad news. You cannot legally extend a three wire circuit. While an inspector MAY allow you to rewire your dryer MOVING the existing cable, you would not be allowed to splice on new cable and extend it.

The proper solution is to add a new circuit from the panel with all new four conductor cable.
 
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Old 08-16-06, 12:50 PM
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Let me start off by saying that I live in Fairbanks Alaska and we don't have to have the approval of the local building department as there isnít one. I have already made several electrical changes in my house this summer and have some knowledge about electricity. I also need to say that I may not be using the correct terminology for what I am trying to accomplish.

My question concerning the dryer is that I need to move it about 10 feet away from the existing 220v, 3 wire outlet. When I purchased my dryer last year I found that it didnít come with the cable to plug it in with. I had to purchase a 6 foot cable separately from Home Depot. When I purchased the cable I was looking to see if they had anything longer than 6 foot but they didnít have any. The 6 foot cable served its purpose but now I need to move the dryer to a different spot in the same room because of venting issues.

What I want to know is can I remove the existing 3 wire cable, that I purchased at Home Depot, from the dryer and install a 3 wire cable that I am going to have to make (10 foot) with the same gage wire. I also plan on putting screw rings on the three wires that connects to the dryer. The other end will have a 3 wire plug attached to it so I can plug it back into the current outlet. The second question is if I canít find the correct gage of 3 wire cable can I use 4 wire cable of the correct gage and only use 3 of the wires?

NOTE: I do not want to move the existing dryer outlet to the other side of the room because that would mean that I would have to cut a hole into the drywall so I could install the cable. That is to time consuming.

My main concern is that replacing the 6 foot cable with a 10 foot cable would cause a power overload on the cable. I hope this clears up my question.
 
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Old 08-16-06, 01:00 PM
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No, you cannot legally or safely do this.
 
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Old 08-16-06, 01:32 PM
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[QUOTE=ausmith]
My question concerning the dryer is that I need to move it about 10 feet away from the existing 220v, 3 wire outlet.
1. What I want to know is can I remove the existing 3 wire cable, that I purchased at Home Depot, from the dryer and install a 3 wire cable that I am going to have to make (10 foot) with the same gage wire.
2.The second question is if I can’t find the correct gage of 3 wire cable can I use 4 wire cable of the correct gage and only use 3 of the wires?

3. NOTE: I do not want to move the existing dryer outlet to the other side of the room because that would mean that I would have to cut a hole into the drywall so I could install the cable. That is to time consuming.QUOTE]

1. No if you want it to meet the NEC standards. You need to move the receptacle.
2. you can use the 3 or 4 wire cable .#10 copper is likely the size required.
3. Thats not that hard to do. I assume you would install a new circuit under the house.
The hardest thing is to drill through the floor and 2x4. You only need to purchase a
box that will mount in to Sheetrock. HD has these. Stick the wire through the drilled
hole and then into the box leaving enough wire to make up to the receptacle. Install the box in the Sheetrock. Install receptacle in box with a cover plate.
 

Last edited by wareagle; 08-16-06 at 01:43 PM.
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Old 08-16-06, 04:46 PM
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I'll go out on limb here... Why not re-locate the vent?

Do you know if the 10' is nearer or farther away from where the ckt starts? You may be able to shut it off and re-locate what you have.
 
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Old 08-16-06, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft
No, you cannot legally or safely do this.
You can do something illegally and still do it perfectly safely.

There. That should stir the pot.
 
  #10  
Old 08-16-06, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by ausmith
My main concern is that replacing the 6 foot cable with a 10 foot cable would cause a power overload on the cable. I hope this clears up my question.
We do it with welding machines all the time. While it is not "Code-compliant" (of which you have dutifully been made aware) a PROPERLY made longer cord will function perfectly well, if you prefer this solution over moving the receptacle.

The Code is half about safety and half about building standards. You would assume all risks involved with the longer cord, such as it being accessible to damage, etc.
 
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Old 08-16-06, 06:22 PM
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You can do something illegally and still do it perfectly safely

Reminds of this story when I was younger, see there was this........ Oops never mind..

Again, Why not move the vent?
Aswell, if its only 10' why can't you do another space evaluation?
You may spend 3 days here and a month on the change,
So explore your options.
 
 

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