Crimping Technique

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  #1  
Old 08-26-06, 01:41 AM
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Crimping Technique

Would someone please explain the correct technique to crimp insulated connectors on to wire (stranded or non-stranded) 12 and 14 gauge).

I have one of the Kelin tools crimpers (with insulated and non insulated nests in the jaws) and when I crimp all I seem to do is flatten the connector. The wire seems tight but it just doesn't look right.

Thanks for your help,
David
 
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Old 08-26-06, 03:50 AM
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This is gonna be hard to discribe on the net but here goes.

I always use the part of the crimper that has one rounded side and a point on the other jaw that pokes into the crimp. > C

I incert the crimp so that the open part of the C is facing away from the pointy part of the crimper.

I also never use crimps of this type on solid wire. IMHO they just dont do right, and can be pulled back off too easy. Solid wires get wrapped directly around the screw, or I use a mechanical lug.

Notice I said this type of crimp. Before I get blasted. Beucannon type crimps that are designed for splicing wires are designed for solid or stranded wires. I am assuming here that we are talking about crimping one wire to a solderless connector then screwing it onto a device.
 
  #3  
Old 08-26-06, 11:00 AM
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Thanks for the reply

Thanks for the info.

I have used the Buchanan splices (copper barrells) with the four point cimp. I think they even make a non-inuslated terminal but not many places carry it.

Going back to your discription of crimping the insulated connectors. Assuming the terminal has a C the point of the crimper goes against the back of the C as you indicated (Point>C). How should the open end look after the crimp - does it split open? Does it look different for solid wires vs. stranded (notwithstanding your concerns about using these terminals with solid wire).

Regards,
David
 
  #4  
Old 08-26-06, 11:08 AM
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The reason why I orient the tool the way I do is so that the C does not open.

It does tend to open more on solid wire, as when the point goes in the c cannot properly stay closed. Try a couple solid wires and see how easy it is to pull the crimp back off. Then try stranded. if done properly, the strands will break first.
 
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