Plasma television on wall?

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  #1  
Old 08-26-06, 07:14 AM
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Plasma television on wall?

Who has installed a plasma TV on a wall? How do you go about powering it (thru the wall, no wires hanging down)? Do you recess a receptacle?
 
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  #2  
Old 08-26-06, 07:38 AM
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Generally when i wire a house for an "over the fireplace" plasma we just put a receptacle on the wall about 7 foot high. Now if you want to get more spoecific the mounting bracket installation instructions will give you a better idea of where the receptacle needs to be located...if you have morequestions let us know
 
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Old 08-26-06, 08:00 AM
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The receptacle can be flush mounted on the wall? The plug won't be sticking out too far behind the plasma TV?
 
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Old 08-26-06, 10:21 AM
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Look for something like this:

http://www.taymac.com/taymac/recessed-interior.html

I've got the exterior version for weatherproof-while-in-use. I took a look at it and the cover could be permanently removed by sawing off three small hinge tabs. If you set the plastic backing flush with the sheetrock surface, like the face of a mud ring, it would look kind of like a clock hanger recep.

The TayMac mounts on a standard 4" square box, one of which is supplied in the kit. I ordered mine from Home Depot a couple of years ago; it was not a user-friendly process. It was relatively expensive but I don't remember the cost. Mine would not fit in a 2x4 wall. You will need 2x6 at minimum.
 
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Old 08-26-06, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by ArgMeMatey
Look for something like this:

http://www.taymac.com/taymac/recessed-interior.html
Looks like a way too expensive item to be buying when all one really needs is a standard clock recepticle.
 
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Old 08-26-06, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by jwhite
Looks like a way too expensive item to be buying when all one really needs is a standard clock recepticle.
Maybe so. I wondered if a clock receptacle would be recessed deeply enough to accommodate a (presumably) grounded plug.

http://www.electricsupplyonline.com/prod/cooper-receptacles/775v-sp_w010153.php

On the other hand, if I were spending the thousands of dollars that a plasma TV costs, $30 or so would not seem like a lot of money to me if it got the job done right.
 
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Old 08-26-06, 02:33 PM
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Thanks for the replies guys!

What type of box would that clock receptacle require?
 
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Old 08-26-06, 02:35 PM
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SG 2 1/2 deep but I prefer the 3 1/2 deep.
 
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Old 08-26-06, 03:18 PM
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Don't forget the cable connection, which should be in a close by location, unless you have a converter for sattelite.
 
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Old 08-26-06, 03:22 PM
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The cable will go into the cable box which will be sitting somewhere else. There will be 3 RCA cables running video from the cable box to the television, they can just come thru a hole in the wall.
 
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Old 08-26-06, 06:29 PM
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Be sure the cables that have the RCA connectors are building wire rated, not just regular cables that would go from device to device in a rack.
 
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Old 08-26-06, 08:07 PM
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Why is that?
 
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Old 08-27-06, 08:01 AM
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If the wire is in the concealed wall, then the cable and/or conductor jacket must have an insulation rating similar to a regular building wire insulation. See Table 310.13 for recognized insulation types.
 
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Old 08-27-06, 08:03 AM
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Yeah, sure, ok, I'll be sure to do just that
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-27-06 at 08:11 AM. Reason: removed quote as it's unnecessary to quote the entire post that's directly above yours
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Old 08-27-06, 08:27 AM
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Don't laugh Voltagehz. I was gonna post the same warning. The cables that you get off the shelf can and do start fires when burried in walls. This is a serious concern, not just a dumb code requirement.
 
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Old 08-27-06, 08:31 AM
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Originally Posted by jwhite
The cables that you get off the shelf can and do start fires when burried in walls.
At one volt peak-to-peak? Please elaborate.
 
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Old 08-27-06, 08:56 AM
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Ok I am absent the data. I have been looking for the links but not found them yet. My info comes from other message boards that I follow and links posted some time ago by members.

It has to do with the cable jacket deteiorating over time due to lack of heat dissapation. Heat is a function of wire size and amps, not volts. I am speculating that if the outer jackets fail, sparks can jump from one cable to the other. I also remember it was just a problem with plasma tvs not regular tvs.

I did notice today, that the installation companies web sites almost all state that they install the cables in surface wire mould.. They did not get into why. It may just be because it is easier for them. It could also be because the room will have AC and be less likely to have a heat build up than a wall cavity.
 
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Old 08-27-06, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by jwhite
Don't laugh Voltagehz. I was gonna post the same warning. The cables that you get off the shelf can and do start fires when burried in walls. This is a serious concern, not just a dumb code requirement.
You are telling me that video and low level audio signal wires will cause a fire?

Can you please reference me to just one example of the fires that they cause?

EDIT: JWhite, you have to find out what type of Plasma television you were reading about to be sure.
Some models have a "VCR style" box that you put with your components. That box has a single trunk line that connects to the Plasma display. In that case, that cord contains high voltage (high compared to the rest of the lines, at least). In that case I would be sure to use rated cords.

However, in my case, the plasma is self contained (no separate box). It will be getting power from it's own cord that will be plugged into the recessed receptacle mentioned above. The only lines going thru the wall will be very low voltage and current signal wires.
 

Last edited by VoltageHz; 08-27-06 at 09:28 AM.
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Old 08-27-06, 03:23 PM
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VoltageHz,
I surely cannot quote incidents where low voltage wire installed concealed in a wall would cause a fire, but the NEC is very clear about the requirements.
In the 2002 NEC:
800.50 covers communication circuits,
820.49 and 820.50 covers CATV circuits
 
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Old 08-27-06, 03:25 PM
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As I said earlier, yeah, sure, ok, I'll be sure to do just that
 
  #21  
Old 08-27-06, 04:18 PM
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Those codes are for people who install bare wire into walls. Voltage will have no problems, EVER, from installing normal RCA cables in walls, unless he hooks those said cables to a 1000kw generator to test the insulation. Good luck mate!
 
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Old 08-27-06, 04:22 PM
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Thanks brother.

FWIW, I will be using high quality Monster Cable interconnects for all signals, it will be a 5 foot run in the wall, there is no insulation in this wall cavity.
I don't care whether they are rated for in wall use or not, no one is going to tell me that these cables will deteriorate faster than the crap wire that phone companies or security companies will put thru your walls.
 
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Old 08-27-06, 04:32 PM
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You won't have any issues at all. I have a audio system setup in my house with all standard speaker cables going through the walls. I take a look at them every year or so to see if they are holding up, and they are. Plus, they won't sell a "high quality" RCA or speaker wire that is specifically meant for walls without paying up the poop shoot for it.
 
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Old 08-27-06, 04:56 PM
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Originally Posted by HotinOKC
You won't have any issues at all. I have a audio system setup in my house with all standard speaker cables going through the walls. I take a look at them every year or so to see if they are holding up, and they are. Plus, they won't sell a "high quality" RCA or speaker wire that is specifically meant for walls without paying up the poop shoot for it.
explain to me how you check cables yearly that are burried inside the wall? Do you re rock your house yearly?
 
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Old 08-27-06, 08:04 PM
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I have read of a case where a piece of ground lifted audio equipment shorted and sent high current through the audio cables in the wall, starting a fire. This happened in Boise, Idaho but I can not find any links to the story online.
 
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Old 08-28-06, 12:23 PM
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It is so the cables don't carry fire as fast, to my understanding, not that they may catch fire themselves.
 
  #27  
Old 08-28-06, 10:09 PM
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I didnt have to use a recessed box(clock box) on mine the mount gave me more than enough room to clear the plug. I did use a double box and brought up cables from the DVD player/VCR/ game connectors/ect. Basically I exteded all the connectors on the back to an array of say type connectors on a wall panel. If I had it to do again I would probably just bring the cables through a hole in the sheetrock. This would be must easier to patch if I ever had to take it out.
 
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