wiring basement bedroom

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  #1  
Old 08-28-06, 04:36 PM
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wiring basement bedroom

I am wiring an ad on basement bedroom. The circuit will be Arc fault as required by code, 15 amp 14 gauge wiring. Here is my question.

I am bringing in the source wire through the switch box for the overhead light. Then I will power the 5 bedroom outlets on that same circuit all using 14-2 wire. I thought I needed to pull the wire through the switch, to the overhead fixture using 14-3 to the light, then use 14-2 to run back to the wall and in to the recepticles.

I was told instead that I could just run the supply into the wall switch box, bring the recepticles wiring into the switch box and pigtail the source off to each.

Now I am confused, which is the correct way?

Thanks in advance for answers.
 
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Old 08-28-06, 05:21 PM
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You will only be bringing one cable to the switch box to energize the receptacles. The best thing to do is to draw the room off on paper and see where the most common sense method of wiring it will be. You would be better off running a separate circuit for lighting for more than one reason. Suppose you have to perform maintenance on the light fixture. Where will you plug in your lamp to see by? Likewise if you have to work on a receptacle, at least you will have general lighting to see by.
Post back if we can help further.
 
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Old 08-28-06, 06:49 PM
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There is no correct way. As long as you abide by code, you can do either of the methods you proposed.

Keep in mind that box fill rules may prevent too many wires in the switch box, so buy the deepest boxes you can find.

Personally I would go with 12 gage wire and a 20 amp circuit, at least for the receptacles.

Keep in mind also that a bedroom in a basement needs an approved means of egress to the outside. If you don't have this then don't build a bedroom in the basement.
 
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Old 08-29-06, 08:57 AM
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Thanks chandler and Racraft. My first thought was 12 gauge 20 amp also. However, after talking with the local code inspector when I went to put in the permit and aasked a simple question, he made the comment "For a circuit that simple you really ought to use 15 amp and just pull 14 gauge, much easier to pull."

So considering this is the guy who will inspect my work, I figured I ought to heed that comment.

I already ran the wiring diagram and I think the original way I plannedit works best. Just got confused when somebody told me to run it through the switch box. Figured maybe that was a section of the NEC I didn't see.

I am running the lights and receps on one circuit because I am putting it on afci and everything in the bedroom has to be afci protected for bedrooms. Also I do have an egress window of appropriate size the house is a walkout. That's why I want to afci so I can call it a bedroom if I ever want to sell.

Thanks again for your help.
 
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Old 08-29-06, 09:28 AM
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Your last comment just screams for this to be a 20 amp circuit.

"So I can call it a bedroom if I ever want to sell" means that you, or someone else, might want to use the room for some other purpose. If, for example, you want to make it an office and use computers you will regret that the circuit is only 15 amp.

It's your house and you can make it a 15 amp circuit, but I feel the inspector pushed you in the wrong direction.
 
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Old 08-29-06, 02:35 PM
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Thanks for your response, I have thought of that and maybe this is duplicative of effort, but I am putting an isolated ground circuit in the bedroom specifically for a computer, plus one in a theatre room to protect the high dollar av equipment I will have installed there. I know it eats up two breakers but from everything I have read it seems like the best protection.
 
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Old 08-29-06, 03:32 PM
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An isolated ground circuit in a residence is a waste of money. Just put in a dedicated circuit instead.
 
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