outlet and switch near kitchen sink

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  #1  
Old 09-07-06, 06:44 PM
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Question outlet and switch near kitchen sink

Is there anything in the NEC about how close to the kitchen sink I can but a GFCI outlet and a switch (to control the garbage disposal)? They will be on the wall behind the sink. If they are 6 inches to the left of the left edge of the sink is that OK? Is it OK for them to be adjacent to each other (any concerns about turning on the disposal with a wet hand and being so close to the outlet)?

Also, I have two 20 amp circuits already for outlets, and am installing a new 20 amp circuit for a built in (900W)microwave. Can I connect a new kitchen GFCI outlet to this microwave circuit? Or should I add the new outlet to one of the existing outlet circuits?

Thanks for the help.

Daniel
 
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  #2  
Old 09-07-06, 07:02 PM
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The built in microwave needs a dedicated circuit.

Generally the receptacle for a garbage disposal is UNDER the sink, where it does not need GFCI protection and should not be GFCI protected. The switch, no matter where it is, does not need GFCI protection..

All kitchen counter top receptacles need GFCI protection, no matter where the sink is located, or even if there is one.
 
  #3  
Old 09-07-06, 07:33 PM
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Thanks racraft- I'll put the microwave on a dedicated circuit and not use that for an outlet.

I wasn't clear enough about the disposal question: the outlet is not for the disposal, only the switch is. My question is if the outlet and switch are too close to each other or to the sink?

Thanks a lot,

Daniel
 
  #4  
Old 09-07-06, 07:37 PM
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There is no such thing as too close to the sink.
 
  #5  
Old 09-07-06, 08:01 PM
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Thanks a lot for the help!
 
  #6  
Old 09-07-06, 08:57 PM
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ANY RECEPTICAL in a kitchen must (in MA.) (should for all practical reasons) be GFCI protected.
But switches , even though your hands are wet... don't need protction.
FACT: You can only die from a toaster or esspresso machine (coffee pot).

(sorry for the Joke and sarcasem)
 
  #7  
Old 09-08-06, 05:25 AM
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lee,

Are you kidding? ANY receptacle in a kitchen should be GFCI protected?

The one serving the refrigerator? The one serving the clock? The one serving the the gas stove? The one serving the built in microwave?

Sorry, I don't agree.
 
  #8  
Old 09-08-06, 06:06 AM
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Smile

In my humble opinion,
If you're talking about a 900 watt microwave that you sit on the counter and plug in, you don't need a seperate circuit.
Since (as you say) you already have the two required (20A) small appliance circuits feeding the kitchen counter receptacles you're OK, just plug it in.
If you (do) add another (20A) small appliance circuit to feed the counter mounted receptacle for the (900 watt) microwave, you can add as many additional (GFCI protected) receptacles to this circuit as you want, as long as the additional receptacles are located in the kitchen.
If you're installing a built-in microwave it's a good idea to install a individual circuit to feed it instead of tapping a existing small appliance circuit. If you replace it with a larger one (1200 watt or larger) in the future, it will be required.
As I said... just my opinion... others may vary.
steve
 
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