Who makes these outlets

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Old 09-17-06, 06:42 PM
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Who makes these outlets

A few month ago I had a new HVAC unit installed in the attic. In the process of the installation the electrician installed a new outlet near the HVAC unit. The outlet seemed to be very good quality and I asked who made them but have since forgotten. The connecting screws had square wahers under them and to make the connection you just slide a straight wire beneath the washer and tightened the screw. I have numerous residential(junk) grade outlets to replace and thought these would be good.
Who makes these and can they be found at the local super stores? Are they good outlets.
 
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Old 09-17-06, 06:50 PM
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NOt sure who made yours, but Cooper lighting makes an excellent commercial grade receptacle with a stab back type hole setup, but you tighten down the screw to capture the wire, similar to a GFCI.
 
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Old 09-17-06, 07:01 PM
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Most major manufacturers offer "spec-grade" devices which are heavy duty.
Most spec-grade receptacles do have this "back-wire" feature. Some use typical screw terminals.
 
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Old 09-17-06, 07:05 PM
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All/ most mfgrs. make these type of recptacales. However I have found that when used with SOLID wire the clamps are not the best. as some may have found with the GFCIs,' as you twist and turn them in to position,they tend to loosen up.
I'm a firm beleiver of twist and tighten (screw terminal) for solid wire.
There are VERY good ones out there, However I don't think that they are cost effective for the residential application.
 
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Old 09-18-06, 03:46 AM
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Lee's right about the cost. The ones I was mentioning cost somewhere near $2.49 each, so in a commercial application, they may be ok, but not very efficient in residential. BUT, they are nice to use on a remodel. No twisting, solid attachment of wires.
 
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Old 09-18-06, 12:32 PM
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A "spade-type" crimp lug compressed under a device terminal is a reliable connection.

This is best effected using 6" "device-leads",
stranded wire best ( flexibility), between the device and the Branch-Circuit conductors in the outet-box. With this connection, a defective device connection will not open the circuit.
 
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Old 09-19-06, 01:25 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler
Lee's right about the cost. The ones I was mentioning cost somewhere near $2.49 each, so in a commercial application, they may be ok, but not very efficient in residential. BUT, they are nice to use on a remodel. No twisting, solid attachment of wires.
Its a real shame that the $100 or so difference between using residential grade and industrial grade electrical componets makes such a difference in home wiring. I have to admit though that I change out more outlets to match paint than anything else.
 
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Old 09-19-06, 01:33 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler
NOt sure who made yours, but Cooper lighting makes an excellent commercial grade receptacle with a stab back type hole setup, but you tighten down the screw to capture the wire, similar to a GFCI.

OK, I blew it. I didnt notice at the time this was a GFCI outlet that was being installed. I only saw the back of it from a distance.
 
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Old 09-19-06, 03:49 AM
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We call these type connections "pressure plate"

The sell them at the big box store for two to three dollars each. the regular recs are thirty nine to fourty nine cents.

I buy them for work because we use mostly stranded thhn. the cost of the device is offset by the reduced labor to install them.
 
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