Type of Receptacle?

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Old 09-23-06, 11:06 AM
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Type of Receptacle?

Anyone familiar with an older receptacle that looks like this?


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Old 09-23-06, 11:07 AM
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Yes.
.....
 
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Old 09-23-06, 11:11 AM
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What is the modern equivalent? I believe it is a high voltage recepatacle based on the way it is wired. Not sure of the amperage - Unfortunately I could not locate the breaker associated with it. Tried every breaker in the box - no luck. Finally had to shut the main power breaker to work on the outlets & switches in this partucular room.
 
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Old 09-23-06, 01:12 PM
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II doubt it is high voltage but it may be a 240v outlet operating off two non-interconnected single pole breakers (120V breakers).

Turn off all breakers. If you feel comfortable working in an open breaker box check each with an analog volt meter to be sure they are off. If so turn on then back off till one energizes the circuit. Turn that one off and continue till you find the other one(s) that control the outlet.

Of course you could have two wires from different breakers accidentally bleeding voltage or misswired together but that is probably less likely. The above method will also show that.

What did you want to use it for? Or are you just curious.
 
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Old 09-23-06, 02:52 PM
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Thanks I'll try what you said. In terms of what i was trying to use it for. I was basically changing all the switches & outlets in this house (updating them) & this is the last remaining one. So I'm just trying to figure out what's up with it & possbily updating it. It looks as if its supplied by two hot wires so I assume its 240V (that's what I meant by "high" voltage.
 
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Old 09-23-06, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by bvgas
...Tried every breaker in the box - no luck. Finally had to shut the main power breaker to work on the outlets & switches in this partucular room.
What did you use for testing?

I've seen similar receptacles for speakers on theatre stages, too, but can't really be sure what yours looks like yet.
 
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Old 09-23-06, 04:44 PM
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Is there any writing at all on the face of the device?
 
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Old 09-23-06, 04:53 PM
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No writing on the device. Interms of testing I used a typical neon circuit tester as well as plugging devices into the receptacles in this room as well as having overhead lights controlled by the switches. When I tested each breaker "individually" the power in this one room never went off either in the receptacles or overheads. I actually didn't test the one receptacle I'm asking about because I have no device which I can actually plug into it. It does have current when the main breaker is on though becuase I tested it with my voltage tester & circuit tester.

I've having trouble getting a picture in my post. Basically its two slots angles toward eachother & a center hole below & in the middle.
 
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Old 09-23-06, 05:46 PM
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Here is a chart of all NEMA recepticles. Which one does your's resemble?
http://www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm
 
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Old 09-24-06, 07:54 AM
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Thanks for the link. I'll double check the recepatacle & compare it to the chart to see if something matches
 
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Old 09-24-06, 09:20 AM
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You need to place them on a photo site such as photobucket or flickr, or a private website, then you can place the URL in your post.

That said, if they are largiish slots with a round ground hole, I believe you have an RV power recepticle. It is not a NEMA configuration, but is modern. It is rated 30A 125V.
 
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Old 09-24-06, 01:34 PM
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On closer inspection it is actually two angled slots with a center vertical slot not a hole. After comparing it to the NEMA chart it resembles the 20 Amp 125/250 V, 3 pole/3 wire receptacles (There are two a 20 R & a 20P What's the difference?). I have my doubts that it is 240 V receptacle - If it is should not two of the three wires be hot?. Assuming its only 120 V would it be adequate to replace it with a standard 20 Amp rated receptacle?? I also was able to locate the breaker associated with it & it is listed at 20 Amps (still could not find the breaker or breakers which control the overheads in this room).
 
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Old 09-24-06, 06:15 PM
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If it has lots about the size of a normal outlet slot, then it could be an old 240 V receptacle, or a grounded 120V recptacle, before the familar U-ground recptical became accepted.
 
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Old 09-25-06, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by bvgas
...There are two a 20 R & a 20P What's the difference?). ....
"R" means receptacle, and "P" means plug. They are mirror-images of each other when viewed head-on. All configurations have an "R" and a "P." A "C" means connector, which is the female end of an extension cord, so it is the same configuration as an "R."
 
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