Hot Tub Wiring

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  #1  
Old 09-24-06, 02:35 PM
jn
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Hot Tub Wiring

I have a used hot tub to wire up:
This is at a remote clubhouse, no local codes/inspectors to go by.
It has a Spa Builders LX-20 panel/heater.
Nameplate says 110/220Volt, 20/50 Amp
It has four screw down lugs to attach incoming wiring
(Black, Red, White, and bare gound).
There is no GFCI at the tub.
The circuit breaker panel is within 20 Ft of the tub, 10 feet of wiring inside the house and 10 feet outside on other side of a foundatation wall.
The place I removed it from simply had 10/3 with ground wiring going to the unit, with a 30Amp breaker. I know this isn't right, and he complained that one of the reasons he was giving it away was that it popped the breaker every now and then.
I am looking for advise to properly instal the unit.
 
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Old 09-24-06, 03:23 PM
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Find the manufacturers instructions and we'll go from there.
 
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Old 09-24-06, 03:26 PM
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Start with a 6/3 nm cable from the panel to the foundation, then buy a hottub 50a disconnect box with the GFCI breaker. Then run 3/4" pvc with 3 #6 & 1 #10 green wire from this box to the tub. Is there room in your house panel for a 2-pole breaker?
 
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Old 09-25-06, 07:19 AM
jn
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The manufacturer doesn't have this model listed for support.
I still emailed them for information but haven't heard anything back yet.

The panel in the house had all slots filled with breakers, but luckily when I removed the faceplate I found that 2 of them have no wires going to them.
I have removed the 2 unused breakers and moved things around to get the 2 open slots right next to each other at the bottom left side of the panel.
Does the panel just get a typical 50 AMP 2 Pole or could this be a ground fault breaker. (I suppose it makes more sense to have the GFCI in the disconnect though, so if it trips you don't have to walk though the house to the panel - probably dripping all the way!)

I don't have to run a separate 110V 20AMP circuit?
I see inside the unit where they just take 2 wires off of where one of the hot legs hooks up. One of them is used with the neutral to handle all the 110V stuff (blower, pump, light etc.)
The other runs with the 2nd hot leg to the heater to give it 220V.
 
  #5  
Old 09-25-06, 07:24 AM
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jn,

Before proceeding with this install, properly identify each and every circuit breaker in your panel. You should already have known, without having to open the panel, that two breakers were not used. This information could save your life some day.

While you can use a GFCI at the main panel, it might be better to use a regular breaker. Two GFCI in series is asking for trouble. 240 volt GFCI breakers are also expensive.

Only use NM for any wiring that is inside the house. Once you leave the house you need a separate insulated ground wire, which NM does not have. NM is also not waterproof.

There are plenty of other rules for hot tubs which you need to follow. Please make yourself aware of them BEFORE proceeding.
 
  #6  
Old 09-25-06, 07:44 AM
jn
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This isn't my place, ( it is my brother-in-laws). That is why I didn't know what breaker was doing what. I do have a circuit breaker finder/identifier so it will be relatively easy to ID all the circuits for him while I'm there. I will then double check them by turing all the breakers off and going thru them one at a time.
Anyway - back the installation.
Is a GFCI diconnect required? Can it be on the house where the power comes out of the building? This is 10 feet or so from where the tub will sit.
Is the 6 AWG 50AMP be enough to power the unit with everything running? The plate says 110/220 Volt 20/50 AMP.

I use NM in the house to the disconnect.
What type of wire is recommended to go in the 3/4 " PVC conduit from the disconnect to the tub?
 
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Old 09-25-06, 08:22 AM
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> Is a GFCI diconnect required? Can it be on the house where
> the power comes out of the building? This is 10 feet or so
> from where the tub will sit.

A disconnect is required and a GFCI is required, but you do not need to have a GFCI disconnect. You can use a GFCI breaker in the main panel, run 6/3g NM-B cable to a standard non-fused disconnect box on the exterior wall, then continue to the tub with 3/4" or larger (I prefer 1" or 1-1/4") conduit. The disconnect should be rated at least 50A; the 60A type sold for air conditioners is acceptacle. You should price this option against one of the many "spa kits" which comes with a GFCI disconnect and some odds and ends.

Personally, I prefer to keep the GFCI breaker in the main panel if possible. However, you should definitely price out your options; sometimes one method is much cheaper than the other based on the cost of a GFCI breaker for your panel.

> Is the 6 AWG 50AMP be enough to power the unit with
> everything running?

Yes.

> What type of wire is recommended to go in the 3/4" PVC
> conduit from the disconnect to the tub?

Stranded THHN/THWN-2 in black (#6), red (#6), white (#6), and green (#10). Note that bare wire is prohibited for the ground in this conduit.
 
  #8  
Old 09-25-06, 05:27 PM
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Here is a good link for hot tub wiring:

http://www.selfhelpandmore.com/homewiringusa/2002/accessory/hottub/index.htm
 
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