...Wall Heater (+ Appliances Amp. Hr. Draw)

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Old 09-24-06, 06:17 PM
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Question ...Wall Heater (+ Appliances Amp. Hr. Draw)

I want to run my wall heater, refrigerator, ceiling fan, and fluorescent lite all on one 20 amp branch circuit. The fan and lite are very minimal amps, but I want to know how many amps my 'frige and wall heater require to run. Can't find a tag on the wall heater motor, and am not able to pull 'frige out to look at it, at this time. Any guesstimates on the amperage required for the heater fan motor, and the (approximately 18sq.ft.) old 'frige? That would help me in deciding if it's ok to run all four things on one circuit. Thanks in advance for any help.
 
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Old 09-24-06, 06:21 PM
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I want to run my wall heater, refrigerator, ceiling fan, and fluorescent lite all on one 20 amp


Why!?
 
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Old 09-24-06, 08:08 PM
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I agree, why???


-The heater can be anywhere from 750-2000 watts. Rating plate on the unit somewhere. Back of the enclosure? On top of the enclosure? Just inside the front cover?.....

-The fridge can be from 5-15 amps. Rating plate on the door frame or just inside one of the doors inside the unit.
 
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Old 09-24-06, 08:11 PM
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An avg. refridgerator is around 500 watts.
 
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Old 09-24-06, 08:15 PM
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My relatively new Amana (~18') is 7.17 amps, or 860 watts.
 
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Old 09-25-06, 04:01 AM
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Thanks for all the info. The reason I wanted to run all 4 on one circuit is that they are all in the kitchen. I have a very small house and was trying to separate branch circuits by room. All other kitchen stuff is run on separate, dedicated circuits. This is what I had left over. Just wanted tp make sure these 4 items would run on a 20 amp circuit. Suppose I could run the wall heater on the living room circuit. Again, thanks for the input.
 
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Old 09-25-06, 04:16 AM
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Smile

This is what the electrical code requires:
All 120V receptacles in the kitchen have to be on 20A small appliance circuits. Nothing else can be on these circuits. Which means you cant add lights or any hard wired appliances to these circuits (including heaters).

If the heater pulls over 10 amps (1200Watts @120V), it has to have it's own dedicated circuit.

The fridge must be on a 20A small appliance circuit or it's own 15A dedicated circuit.

The manufacturer is required by law to place the voltage and operating amperage (or KW) on their appliance.
steve
 
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Old 09-25-06, 04:45 AM
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Hello: Willg54

I edited the title of the posts question nearest as possible to the nature of the question. The original wording stated gas heater....

Which drew my attention being as I am in the gas industry. Question not relevant to service nor repair of the heater. Relevant to it's electrical power draw of that appliance and circuitrys total amp draw. Hence the title correction best as possible.

Wall heaters with built in fan blowers to distribute heat over a broader area usually do not draw any more current then a table top or desk top fans motor. That's all it is. A fan motor spinning a squirrel cage blower.

Some wall heaters are equipped with 2 or 3 stage blower fan speeds granted. But none have high electrical draw rates. A few hundred watts at the most.

As a comparison, determine the draw rate based upon any full sized isolating table top fan. About 7-12 amps. Not much.

However, as already stated and is correct, appliances must be separated on circuits from wall receptacles and lighting fixtures. Reason, basically, (I am not an electric an) so if heater or another non lighting appliance blows the circuit and the power gets turned off by the circuit breaker or fuse blows, room would not be without lighting also.

I suspect this is what any licensed and/or qualified electrician would tell you. Same applies in this thread by the professionals here..... And why there are codes governing electrical wiring circuitry.
 
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Old 09-25-06, 07:23 PM
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Willg54; Have you any space in your electric panel? (Small house: Cape, Ranch, Bungalo)?
If so, I would recomend, that you split some of the kitchen load.

Try to give us a larger "picture" of your situation, and we can help.
 
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Old 09-25-06, 08:10 PM
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I have 20 spaces in my 100 amp, Cuttler Hammer breaker box. I have a very small house: bedroom, livingroom, kitchen, and bathroom. Just the basic stuff in each. So, I will split the load accordingly, by code, and, not overloading any one circuit. I have re-written my electrical plan with suggestions from you all. Thanks very much!!
 
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