CPVC pipe vs actual conduit piping

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Old 09-25-06, 01:11 PM
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Cool CPVC pipe vs actual conduit piping

I have a bundle of 10-foot long cpvc pipe from a previous home project.

I want to add a new receptacle in my garage (it's already drywalled) and was planning to run conduit along the inside of the garge to the new location. Is there anything different between cpvc and the gray conduit pipe that I see, or can I simply create a conduit run using my unused cpvc pipe?

I hate to buy new stuff, if I can use what I already own.
 
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Old 09-25-06, 01:21 PM
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First CPVC is plumbing pipe. Not for electrical.

Second tell us more. You probably do not need pipe at all for this.
 
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Old 09-25-06, 02:11 PM
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The simple answer is that you can't use the CPVC for electrical conduit. It's not listed for use as electrical conduit, therefore code prohibits its use.

The longer answer is that the CPVC pipe is probably very similar to Sch 40 PVC conduit. Conduit usually provides UV protection, CPVC probably doesn't. Conduit fittings are made to facilitate pulling wires through without tearing and snagging the insulation, not necessarily so with CPVC pipe.

Finally, according to code schedule 40 PVC is not heavy enough to be considered for protection from damage so in reality both CPVC pipe and grey conduit are inappropriate for the garage walls. For surface mount conduit in a garage you need to use at least EMT. If the wiring is behind the drywall, you can use regular NM-B (Romex) cable.
 
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Old 09-26-06, 10:49 AM
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Cool

Originally Posted by jwhite
...tell us more. You probably do not need pipe at all for this.
Well, I have a garage and house that are new builds. The house wall is drywalled and contains the only outlet. I want to bring that outlet out of the wall and expand it. I also want to tie the outlet(s) for the rest of the garage (I want to add two more receptacles) to it. One on the back wall and one on the opposite wall. The back and opposite walls are exposed studs. Those are no problem. The house wall and ceiling are drywalled. I was planning to run outside the drywall on the house wall and ceiling to the opposite wall through conduit and then run inside the studs like normal when there. The back outlet (I just decided to do) was probably going to run outside the house-wall and into the studs of the back wall.

Am I missing any description? I don't fear the elements eroding the wiring, or rodents getting at them, or for them to get damaged in any other way. I just wanted it to lok better than a wire tacked to the walls.
 
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Old 09-26-06, 11:18 AM
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The national electrical code requires that wires run as you describe (on the outside of drywall) be protected from physical harm.

One problem that you will have is getting from the existing outlet to outside the wall. This wall between the house and the garage is a fire wall so it is not a good idea to just go making a bunch of holes in it to get the cable out of the box to the wall surface.

Is there any way that you could fish the wall? Or intercept the wire in the crawl space or attic? Just a couple thoughts. I will think more on this and others I am sure will chime in on ideas as to what the best solution might be.

Plumbing pipe is not a legal solution.
 
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Old 09-26-06, 11:46 AM
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I suggest that you leave the existing receptacle alone and instead run new circuit.

If you do insist on tapping this circuit, I suggest that run a wire up inside the wall to the ceiling and then over to where you need it. The wires in the ceiling (unless it too is drywalled) do not need to be in conduit.
 
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Old 09-26-06, 11:55 AM
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Post ...Hell no to CPVC...

OK, I will invest in the correct material.

I was assuming that there would be some sort of extension that I could buy to add on to the current electrical box that I could then (essentially) extend that box to the outside of the wall. That would be a 4-outlet plug and the crossroads to the other two sets of plugs.
 
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Old 09-26-06, 12:01 PM
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The house wall and ceiling are drywalled.
 
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Old 09-26-06, 12:01 PM
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"I was assuming that there would be some sort of extension that I could buy to add on to the current electrical "

There is but as you, and I are concerned about how things look I would advise against it. The couduit running up the outside of the will will still be subject to damage. Not as much as just the cable, but I have seen too much old work to believe that it will not get hit with things.
 
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Old 09-26-06, 12:04 PM
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Cpvc

Thanks for the feedback.
 
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