GFCI for garage opener?

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  #1  
Old 10-12-06, 09:21 AM
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GFCI for garage opener?

Since all garage receptacles are supposed to be GFCI, yet a motor is supposed to be something to avoid on using GFCI due to surges upon starting, what is acceptable?

And what about the washer and dryer, located in my garage?
 
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  #2  
Old 10-12-06, 09:54 AM
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Your statement that "all garage receptacles are supposed to be GFCI" is incorrect.

General purpose accessible receptacles are supposed to be GFCI protected, bot ALL receptacles.

Receptacles in the ceiling for garage door openers are not general purpose, and do not need GFCI.

Receptacles that are behind an appliance, like a refrigerator or freezer, or washer or dryer do not need GFCI protection, since they would be hard to get at. If you do have duplex receptacles where you have an extra open receptacle, then simply install a simplex receptacle instead.
 
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Old 10-12-06, 10:01 AM
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A washing machine receptacle would not need to GFCI? Seems to me since water is involved ALL washing machine receptacles should be GFCI.
 
  #4  
Old 10-17-06, 08:56 AM
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Suggestions?

So no one has replied to Joed's comment which is too bad because I think it is really valid. I am concerned because the inspector specifically said all outlets in the garage had to be GFCI.

I have committed to this since I had to break off the ears of the GFCI receptacle to fit the metal box so I cannot return the receptacle. As you all probably know, the GFCI costs about $12 compared to the $2 non-GFCI.
 
  #5  
Old 10-17-06, 09:06 AM
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GFCI for garage opener?

I think racecraft answered the question about he appliances because they are really not general purpose recepticles due to the use and location.

I think your inspector may have been referring to all "general purpose" recepticals and not all recepticals.

I just had a receptical installed behind where a freezer will be. The electrician put in a single outlet instead of a duplex since it was a special purpose outlet.

Just ask your inspector for a specific clarification. He gets paid to answer you questions on how to get it done properly.

Dick
 
  #6  
Old 10-17-06, 09:21 AM
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> the inspector specifically said all outlets in the garage
> had to be GFCI.

National code only requires GFCI protection for general purpose receptacles. Dedicated receptacles for appliances like the door opener, washer and dryer do not require GFCI protection. You may have a local code that overrides the NEC which does require GFCI protection for all garage receptacles, however. Check with the inspector.

Modern GFCI receptacles have few problems with motors, so it really wouldn't hurt to GFCI all the garage receptacles if you had to.
 
  #7  
Old 10-17-06, 09:42 AM
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joed's comment is not valid. Just because a washing maching uses water does not mean it needs a GFCI protected circuit. You can certainly use GFCI protection, but it is NOT required.

GFCI protection is required for kitchen counter receptacles, bathroom receptacles, and general purpose receptacles that are outside, in an unfinished basement, or in a garage. In the new editions of the code they are alsio required for recetpacles near a sink.

GFCIs are NOT required for special purpose receptacles in a basement or garage. This means not for the garage door opener, not for a refrigerator or freezer in the garage, and not for laundry equipment in the garage.

The only exception would be for a duplex recetpacle in which one half of the duplex were open and easily accessible. In these cases, simply use a simplex receptacle.
 
  #8  
Old 10-17-06, 01:19 PM
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> Seems to me since water is involved ALL washing machine
> receptacles should be GFCI.

The main purpose for GFCI in the garage is for cases such as someone plugging in a metal power tool and cutting through the power cord. Or plugging in christmas lights while standing in a puddle of snow. Or similar hot-to-ground faults. Because a washing machine is fully enclosed, there is no way you could come in contact with a hot wire. Thus a grounded outlet suffices for these types of fixed appliances.

Rex Cauldwell (Wiring a House - an excellent book) said that he usually uses GFCI receptacles for garage door openers since they seem to be lightning surge magnets. While they won't help in a direct-strike, they may help prevent a surge from taking out the internal electronics.
 
  #9  
Old 10-17-06, 02:10 PM
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A GFCI receptacle will not be any use if a power surge comes along.
 
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