new service/main/sub panel

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  #1  
Old 10-15-06, 12:27 PM
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new service/main/sub panel

Have a question about a main and a sub panel...
here goes ,I installed a 200amp meter pan with a 200amp exterior grade disconnect switch(200 amp piggyback breaker).I also mounted a 70 amp temp power box with 2 20amp breakers, and a double gfci outlet for temp power when the utility company powers me up.

I will remove the temp and send a feed to the house main panel when construction and back fiiling is done.
The main panel has its own 200 amp breakers as well as the outdoor disconnect which is approximately 120 feet way from the home.
I ran a feed to a sub panel which will power the upstairs and the attic in future.The sub panel has it's own 100 amp breaker.I isolated the netrual bar from the grounding bar and disconnected the neutrals bonding.
Now with all that said I would like to know if it is ok to have the 200 amp breaker in the main panel in line with the main disconnects, and also the 100 amp sub panel breaker in line with the 100amp one I am going to install to feed the sub from the main.

Thanks any info will be appreciated
 

Last edited by JAGA; 10-15-06 at 12:51 PM.
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  #2  
Old 10-15-06, 12:49 PM
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JAGA,
It is unclear from your post where the demarc from the utility is.

You seem to be saying that the utility wiring stops 120 feet from your home, where you installed a main disconnect switch.

this is very uncommon.

Purhaps you are confusing what part is temporary and what part will be left after construction.

I also am confused by why you want to put a 225 amp breaker on a 200 amp service. Do you think you can create power?

Please try to tell us, more clearly, what you want to do, so we can help you find your answers.
 
  #3  
Old 10-15-06, 12:57 PM
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new service/main/sub panel

Sorry for the confusion it is not a 225 amp breaker it is 200 same as disconnect, that is the result of my terrible typing skills.
The temp service is going to stay where it is.The utility company said it was ok, they do not require the meter pan to be mounted on the home. They are coming in from the utility pole to a step down trans(500' run), then to my meter pan.
 
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Old 10-15-06, 01:08 PM
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I am still very confused, but if I am reading your question correctly you want to know if it is ok to have the 200 amp breaker at the pole in series with the 200 amp breaker at the house (required as a disconnect means).


The answer to your questoin must come from the mfg of the equipment. While it is a good possibility that the breakers are series rated, they need to have the breakers listed that way.

The first breaker for the sub panel needs to be at the main panel at the house. This must be not rated higher than the wire size to the sub panel. Again, weather or not the breakers are series rated is a matter of the mfg listing.

I gather from what you said that the main panel at the house is actually a sub panel, since the main service disconnect is at a remote pole. So you need four wires from that pole to the housse panel. And you need to bring the water pipe ground all the way from the house out to that main switch. Yes the entire 150 feet.
 
  #5  
Old 10-15-06, 02:50 PM
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new service/main/sub panel

My question is.. due to the fact of a required disconnect at the pole rated a 200amp, is the redundancy of another 200 amp breaker at the main panel at the house ok?
The same question for the 100 amp sub panel, I am installing a double 100 amp breaker in the main panel to feed the sub, and it has it's own 100 amp breaker in the panel
 
  #6  
Old 10-16-06, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by JAGA
My question is.. due to the fact of a required disconnect at the pole rated a 200amp, is the redundancy of another 200 amp breaker at the main panel at the house ok?
The same question for the 100 amp sub panel, I am installing a double 100 amp breaker in the main panel to feed the sub, and it has it's own 100 amp breaker in the panel
The two disconnects on the main feeder are fine. In fact you have to have a disconnecting means at the house in addition to the one at the yard pole. You do not have to have a disconnecting means at the panel supplied by the one hundred ampere feeder but it will do no harm. You are not required to bring the grounding electrode conductor from the service equipment on the yard pole to the underground metallic water piping at the house by the US NEC. That having been said it would be a very good idea to bond the grounding electrode system at the house to the one at the service equipment even though the code may not require it. If you use multi conductor cable or conduit between the service equipment location and the house main lighting and appliance panel board the best way to bond the two grounding electrode systems together is to run a bare number two copper at least thirty inches deep between the two. Better still would be to run it below the permanent ground water level but in many areas that is impracticable.

I'm guessing that your home may be on well water by the distance between the street and your service. If that is true then you will probably have a plastic water line to bring water into the house. If the well casing is metallic you can vastly improve the grounding of your home by running a bare number two copper conductor with the water line from the metallic well casing to the homes lighting and appliance panel board. If the well casing is plastic then that would be a waste of time.

Do not scrimp on grounding for your home! If the footer trenches are unlined then have the concrete crew stub up a piece of rebar right beneath the location of your home main panel. Make sure that the stub is done with stainless steal or fully galvanized rebar so that it will not rust away were it comes up out of the concrete. You do not need to run a coper conductor down into the footer because the reinforcing steel ties are sufficient connection to make all of the reinforcing steel behave as part of the concrete encased electrode.

If the footer trenches are lined with plastic then the footer steel is useless as a grounding electrode. Were that is the case run a bare number two copper conductor completely around the house in tamped earth outside the footer trenches. That conductor is called a ground ring.

Do not bother with driven rods at the house because if you use the footer steel or a ground ring there is no requirement to use driven rods regardless of whether the water line is metallic. Driven rods are generally the least affective electrodes in common use at residences. The easiest electrodes to install at the service equipment location will be driven rods but there effectiveness is so limited that I would strongly urge you to bond them to the concrete encased electrode or the ground ring at the house as previously described.

Make sure that your telephone and cable, if any, all enter the house at or near the same point. This will facilitate the grounding of these other wire carried utilities to the power systems grounding electrode system. That one step is the most important part of protecting your homes electronic devices from surge and spike damage.
 
  #7  
Old 10-23-06, 07:08 PM
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Hornetd i want to thank you for the info .I personally would rather the double disconnects for a easier emergency cutoff.
 
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