10/3 Romex for electric baseboard?

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Old 10-16-06, 04:55 AM
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10/3 Romex for electric baseboard?

Hi,

I am installing electric baseboard for my basement remodel project. A an electrician friend of mine suggested using 10/3 romex to for the baseboard. His reason was for efficiency/cost.

Other than it being a little tough to work with, are there any problems with this?

Many thanks-
 
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Old 10-16-06, 05:29 AM
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What size baseboard will it serve (wattage)?
 
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Old 10-16-06, 05:29 AM
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What is the amperage requirement of the baseboard heater? What size circuit breaker will you be using? Does it require a 120/240V circuit?
 
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Old 10-16-06, 05:53 AM
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I believe that the standard baseboards run on 240v. It would be served by a 30A breaker.
 
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Old 10-16-06, 06:32 AM
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Unless you are runinng two baseboards on a multiwire circuit you only 10/2. You need to know wattage to confirm the wire size. You can run 3800 watts on a 20 amp circuit. You could run up to 5800 watts on a 30 amp circuit.
 
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Old 10-16-06, 06:41 AM
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joed's post may be a little confusing.

A multi-wire circuit would be two 120 volt circuits that share a common neutral.

His wattage figures for a 20 amp and a 30 amp circuit are based on a 240 volt circuit, which cannot be multiwire.
 
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Old 10-16-06, 09:49 AM
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Thanks for the feedback.

The bottom line is that the 10/3 wire has already been run and I'd like to install two 8 ft 240v 1000 W baseboards and use a 30 amp breaker. Based on the thread, there doesn't appear to be a problem with this.

Does anyone know if this set up will increase efficiency?
 
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Old 10-16-06, 10:20 AM
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You wasted money ion 10-3. You really only needed 12-2.

While it is true that 10 gage wire will increase efficiency, you will not notice it, and it will not make a difference on your electric bill.

Live and learn.

When you wire it do not connect the white wire at either end. Use the black and red wires for the hot wires, and of course use the bare ground wire.
 
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Old 10-16-06, 11:02 AM
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Live and learn indeed- that's my mantra for most home improvement projects!

Thanks-
 
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Old 10-16-06, 01:12 PM
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Agree with Bob about the efficiency. Especially for 2000 watts at 240v. That is only 8.3 amps.

If the load were 3500 watts at 240v the efficiency would be greater, but still nothing you would notice.

I truly don't think any amount of efficiency advantage on a circuit like this would offset the cost difference between the #10 and #12.
Sorry.
 
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