Upgrades to kitchen - I need advice!

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  #1  
Old 10-17-06, 10:02 AM
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Exclamation Upgrades to kitchen - I need advice!

I need to add 3 circuits for my kitchen because I am ripping out my old cabinets in order to install a new dishwasher (the cabinets are old!), a new hung microwave (no existing wiring for it exists), and receptacles for my countertop area.

I need to know if this is all correct:

For the dishwasher & disposer, I will add a new 20amp double breaker, using 12/3 wire to the location. I will wire one outlet for the dishwasher and the other for the disposer. Switch for disposer goes up to countertop with 12/2 wire.

For the microwave, I will run 12/2 wire from new circuit of 20amp single breaker to the outlet hidden within the new cabinet.

For the new outlets, I will wire the first one GFCI protected, and then run the other 1 or 2 behind it on the line. I will be adding a new 20amp circuit for these as well, and using 12/2 wire.

I am doing this myself, and know pretty much what I am doing. But I hope it will pass inspection with no issues. I am not replacing any walls or anything, just fishing the line from my unfinished basement. This requires less up-to-date upgrading to the kitchen right?

Are there any things that I need to consider in order to pass with flying colors? Please help!
 
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  #2  
Old 10-17-06, 10:30 AM
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Unless you already have it, you need a second 20 amp circuit serving the counter top area.

Everything else sounds fine.
 
  #3  
Old 10-17-06, 11:25 AM
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> dishwasher, disposal, microwave

All okay. The dishwasher and disposal could share a single 20A circuit if you wanted to save money on the cable, but there's nothing wrong with your plan.

> For the new outlets...

The countertop receptacles require a minimum of (2) 20A circuits that may serve only countertop receptacles, pantry receptacles, dining room receptacles, the fridge, or a receptacle for a gas fired range. No lights or other receptacles may be on these "small appliance circuits".
 
  #4  
Old 10-17-06, 01:31 PM
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Why do I need 2 20amp circuits feeding the countertop receptacles? Wouldn't I only need 1 if I am putting 3 total in on the countertop, the first one being GFCI and the others behind it on the same circuit?
 
  #5  
Old 10-17-06, 02:04 PM
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It is code for one.
Anmd it allows you to use more appliances at once.
 
  #6  
Old 10-17-06, 02:08 PM
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> Why do I need 2 20amp circuits feeding the
> countertop receptacles?

I'm afraid the only direct answer is: because that's the rule. The NEC requires (2) 20A small appliance circuits. If your dining room and/or pantry are also being remodelled with the kitchen, you can supply the receptacles in either of those areas with the small appliances circuits. If not, both 20A circuits must go to the kitchen countertop receptacles.

The justification for this requirement is that modern living uses a lot of power in the cooking and eating areas. If you look at almost any older home, the kitchen circuits are overloaded (sometimes to dangerous levels); the code committee responded to this shortcoming by mandating 2 circuits for new construction and remodel.

> putting 3 total in on the countertop

Do 3 receptacles meet the minimum spacing requirement for countertop receptacles? To meet minimum, no point along the back edge of the countertop can be more than 24" from a receptacle; which equates to 48" minimum receptacle spacing. Additionally, any countertop segment at least 12" wide needs a receptacle.
 
  #7  
Old 10-17-06, 02:14 PM
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As the others have stated, it is thr NEC that requires two circuits serving the counter top.

Do not be surprised, in the future, if this number rises to three, or if the refrigerator is no longer allowed on this circuit. We just keep coming up woth more and more "things" that use electricity, and these "things" become more and more common, almost to the point of them being necessities.

Think about microwave ovens. Sure, they were luxuries when they first came out. However, they are now to the point that they are so inexpensive (some less than $50) that just about everyone has one.

I do have a clarification to Ben's post on spacing. The counter top area of the sink does not count when determining spacing. Think of each side of the sink as a separate space. This means youmust have a receptacle within 24 inches of each side of the sink, unless the counter top there is less than 12 inches.
 
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