Type of receptacles on 110V/20A circuit

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-26-06, 09:56 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 34
Type of receptacles on 110V/20A circuit

I am planning 2 circuits in my garage that will supply 3 receptacles each along my workbench in my new garage. Since these receptacles will be servicing multiple heavy-duty 110V devices and tools. I am planning to wire these circuits with 12/3 wire in a configuration similar to "kitchen" wiring.

Do I need special receptacles for this circuit? If so, can devices, which I could plug into regular 110V/15A receptacle, plug into these receptacles?

Aside from cost, is there any other issues with this plan?

Thanks,
Derek
PS I know I need 20A 110V breakers.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-26-06, 11:55 PM
rdn2113's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Wally World
Posts: 451
Hi derek,

Whether two 20A circuits will meet your load requirements is something you will have to determine separately.

I'm assuming you are asking about whether you need GFCI receptacles.

Here is the information from the NEC that governs garage receptacles:

Article 210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel

(A) Dwelling Units. All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in (1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.

(1) Bathrooms.

(2) Garages, and also accessory buildings that have a floor located at or below grade level not intended as habitable room and limited to storage areas, work areas, and areas of similar use.

There are exceptions to this requirement but they don't apply in your situation.

Hope this helps. Best wishes!!
 
  #3  
Old 10-27-06, 12:00 AM
rdn2113's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Wally World
Posts: 451
I almost forgot: yes, you can use the GFCI receptacles the same way you would use regular receptacles.
 
  #4  
Old 10-27-06, 03:06 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chesapeake, VA
Posts: 340
Your plan sounds fine. Each circuit will have one GFCI receptacle and 2 standard cheap receptacles. The GFCI will be the first one on the string- bring the incoming wire to the "line" terminals. Then connect the "load" terminals to the other receptacles. Easy

[Edit: I forgot to mention the pigtail; you'll need to pigtail the neutral on the line side of the GFCI receptacles, as pcboss notes.]

If any of those tools are 20A tools, you'll have to get 20A receptacles, which are similar to 15A receptacles, but have a T on one prong and cost a few dollars more. Otherwise, 15A receptacles will be fine.

Since you're going to this trouble, have you considered also putting in a 30A 240V outlet for REALLY heavy tools or welders down the road? You'd need to run a #10-3 cable to it. And probably a 50A NEMA outlet. This circuit could not supply any 115V outlets, and would be a dedicated 240V outlet. I did this in my garage, even though I don't have any 240V tools at the moment.
 

Last edited by grover; 10-27-06 at 02:57 PM.
  #5  
Old 10-27-06, 03:59 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,441
You will need to pigtail the neutrals so the GFIs don't see the imbalance from the other circuit.

You could just run a 3 wire feed to the first box and split it there. You would then run 2 wire + ground to the remaining receptacles, just alternate every other receptacle.
 
  #6  
Old 10-27-06, 04:30 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
If you are using 12-3 cable, then you will either need to use a GFCI breaker, or you will need each receptacle to be GFCI. You cannot share the neutral on the load side of a GFCI receptacle.

I would use 12-2 only (or 12-2-2), and keep each circuit completely separate. If you do this you can get away with 2 GFCI receptacles.
 
  #7  
Old 10-27-06, 06:02 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 5,599
You don't say your location but if you are in Canada you must use 20 amp T receptacles on a 20 amp circuit. Your kitchen comment makes me think you are in Canada. Split kitchen receptacles I don't think are common in USA.
 
  #8  
Old 10-27-06, 10:17 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 34
That is quite a string of replies, I will try to do my best in summarizing and answering questions:

joed, you are on the money, I do live in Canada (Northern Alberta to be precise).

It seems that I have no exception but to use T slot receptacles.

Now, what would be the best wiring configuration:
Use 12/2 for 3 receptacles
Use 12/3 for 3 receptacles in kitchen wiring format
use 12/2/2 as described below (I am assuming that this cable has 2 hot wires and 2 neutrals.

How costly is 12/2/2 wire compared to 12/3 and 12/2?

FYI, I will also be putting a 240V/20A and 240V/40A circuit too.

Thanks,
Derek
 
  #9  
Old 10-28-06, 07:49 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Derek, I have no idea what porices are for wire in Canada, so I won't even take a stab at that part of the question.

I am not aware of any special requirements for this circuit that would prohibit normal appliances from being plugged in.

If you need GFCI protection and you want to use 12-3 then you will need either a GFCI breaker or you will need to use a 20 amp GFCI receptacle at each location. I would decide based on price and how far it is from the garage to the panel to reset a tripped GFCI.

If you run 12-3 from the panel and the want to switch to something else, I would base my decision to go with two runs of 12-2 or one run of 12-2-2 based on where the receptacles will be located.

If you plan on both circuits in each box (either by splitting a duplex receptacle or by having two recepacles) then I would use 12-2-2. However, if you plan on separate boxes and separate receptacles then I would use two runs of 12-2.

12-2-2 has two hot wires (usually red and black) and two neutral wires (usually white and white with a stripe), and then one ground. The name implies that two circuits can be run. It might cometimes be called 12-4.
 
  #10  
Old 10-28-06, 08:09 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 5,599
I don't think garage receptacles are required to be GFCI in Canada. I will try and confirm this, but unless there is a sink within 1m I don't think you need GFCI inside a garage.
 
  #11  
Old 10-29-06, 07:08 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,767
I'd do the boxes in conduit, then you wouldn't need to bother with 12 2/2 . For Recepticles, in addition to the GFCIs, you need to get spec-grade T-slot recepticles.
 
  #12  
Old 10-30-06, 08:49 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 34
Thanks all for the info...

I got the T-slot recepticles, and after considering all this and speaking to one of my co-workers who as it turned out is a master electrician, I've decided to run 2x 12/2 cables to all three duplex receptacles. I'll wire one cable to the top of the receptacles and the other to the bottom of the receptacles. I like the idea of having two neutrals if I will be having two hots. I also got two extra breakers for the extra hots I will run.

Thanks for all your help,
Derek

PS What does it mean doing the boxes in conduit?
 
  #13  
Old 10-31-06, 10:26 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 5,599
It's a waste of cable. The 12/3 would have been perfect fine. However if that is what you want go for it. You will need to split the tabs on both the neutral and the hot in this case.
 
  #14  
Old 11-03-06, 10:36 AM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,767
I should clarify. Conduit means having electrical pipe between the boxes. That basically means you can run the conductors you need now, or in the future, without being tied to what sorts of cables are available.
 
  #15  
Old 11-03-06, 07:08 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,113
Regardless of current code, would not GFCIs' exceed and protect you. After all ,Where ever you reside, water and electricity don't mix well.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'