New garage outlets?

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  #1  
Old 11-03-06, 09:33 AM
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New garage outlets?

I've added a few circuits/outlets in my house... so thats about the extent of my electrical knowledge. Now that my woodworking has been banned from the basement due to dust issues I need to add some outlets to my garage. It is drywalled so I won't be able to fish the walls. Is there a special type of wiring that has to be used for garages(semi-exposed environment). Can I use the metal surrounded type of wire and just tack it on the exterior of the drywall? What is the best way to do this? Also, I live in the great white north and will be needing a heater and apparently the best heaters are 220v so I may want to convert one of my outlets to 220v in the future. What requirements does 220v have? Thanks in advance!!

Scott
 
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  #2  
Old 11-03-06, 10:07 AM
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You might want to consider metal conduit.

For your heater, you have to plan before hand and run a dedicated circuit for it.
 
  #3  
Old 11-03-06, 10:24 AM
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Use good old metal conduit for your runs.

Plan your circuit carefully. P{ut in a dedicated 240 volt circuit NOW for your heating needs later.
 
  #4  
Old 11-03-06, 10:29 AM
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I'd think about a 2nd 240 circuit for tool use - some power tools will run on this to decrease the amperage they need to draw.
 
  #5  
Old 11-03-06, 12:15 PM
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Can I run multiple circuits in the metal conduit and then branch off at the end? 240v is still a 2 wire line correct? Do I just need a heavier guage?
 
  #6  
Old 11-03-06, 12:18 PM
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Please DO NOT attempt this project until you understand more about electricity. I recommend the book "Wiring Simplified" as a starting point for your education.

There are limits to the number of the wires that can be run in conduit.

A straight 240 volt circuit is two current carrying wires and one ground.

A combination 120/240 volt circuit is three current carrying wires and one ground.

Electricity can kill you if you make a mistake. Please don;t become a statistic.
 
  #7  
Old 11-04-06, 07:00 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft
Please DO NOT attempt this project until you understand more about electricity. Electricity can kill you if you make a mistake. Please don;t become a statistic.
Thats why I am here asking questions. I will definitely continue to research this project. I will also check out that book.

So can I put 2 or 3 circuits in a pvc/metal conduit? My garage is attached to the house so I would run the wires in the basement ceiling (floor joists) over to the garage wall and then into conduit from there. Then across the garage and into a junction, then split off to the receptacles. Is this a suitable way to do it?
 
  #8  
Old 11-04-06, 03:30 PM
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Yes you can put several ckts into a conduit. The size of the conduit depends on how many ckts you need/want. 1 ground wire the size of your LARGEST current carrying conductor is good enough, (get to that later).

Figure how many ckts you need, amps/volts /ckt etc. then we can get specific.

Recommende: extend pipe into the basement install a JB (properly sized) there. then thhns' thru the pipe to other junctions, etc.

In the house you can run NM cable, However it may be just as easy and perhaps cost effective to pipe right into the panel.
 
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