wire gauges?

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  #1  
Old 11-03-06, 11:39 AM
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wire gauges?

I need to put in a 30A 220V dual circuit breaker... Can I use 10 gauge wire with a 14/30R 4 prong receptacle?

It's power for a dryer...

Sorry about the mix up...
 

Last edited by loshornos; 11-03-06 at 12:43 PM.
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  #2  
Old 11-03-06, 11:55 AM
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I don't know what you mean by 14/40.

Why don't you tell us what you want to provide power for ane we can start there.
 
  #3  
Old 11-03-06, 01:05 PM
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Yes. What you want is a 120/240v circuit, not simply 220v.

10/3g NM is typical for this application.
 
  #4  
Old 11-03-06, 05:36 PM
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14-30R is the NEMA classification for a 30 AMP 4 wire straight blade receptacle - - AKA a dryer receptacle
 
  #5  
Old 11-03-06, 05:47 PM
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You need a 240 volt breaker, and four conductor 10 gage cable (10-3 with ground).
 
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Old 11-03-06, 06:08 PM
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Bob is right about the two-pole breaker. I read it to say a "220v circuit".
You will not find a literal 120/240v breaker.

Even with a 240v breaker this is still a 120/240v circuit.
 
  #7  
Old 11-06-06, 04:30 AM
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got a 120/240 30 amp dual breaker...

now I need to bring the 10 gauge into the service panel.
Can anyone describe it best without a drawing where each of the four wires go in the panel and get connected to the breaker.

or if someone knows a link with a diagram, that would be great.

Thanks,

loshornos
 
  #8  
Old 11-06-06, 04:38 AM
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The two hot wires get connected to the breaker.

The neutral wire gets connected to the neutral bus, under it's own terminal.

The ground wire gets connected to the ground bus. If the panel allows, you may have two ground wires under the same terminal.

If this is the main panel in the house, the ground buss and the neutral buss may be one in the same.

Be careful in the panel. There are live voltages present which can easily kill you. Turn off the main breaker before starting. If this is a sub panel then I recommend turning off the feed to this panel, so that there is no power to this panel.
 
  #9  
Old 11-06-06, 09:31 AM
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Thanks, just one more...

So, red and black wires go to the breaker. and because it is
a main panel, the neutral and ground go to the same buss?

Thanks, I always turn off the main breaker.
 

Last edited by loshornos; 11-06-06 at 11:34 AM.
  #10  
Old 11-06-06, 01:58 PM
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loshornos,

Yes, BUT just remember even if you turn off the MAIN BREAKER the panel is still live and can KILL if you happen to be routing those wires in from the TOP....the main lugs will still be HOT and ready to reach up and grab you if you let the wire wander....

Becareful !!!!
 
  #11  
Old 11-06-06, 03:02 PM
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Point very well taken....

Thanks again... I will be extremely careful...

Thanks for the warning...
 
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