Getting Ready for Rough-In Inspection

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Old 11-10-06, 02:46 PM
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Post Getting Ready for Rough-In Inspection

I just finished running all the wiring for my kitchen/bath addition, my first major project, and I want to make sure I have everything done before I call for the rough-in inspection. So far, I have all the wires in the boxes stripped, wire-nutted and pigtailed where necessary, all wires stapled within 8" of the box, and every 4' after that. Everything is home-run back to the breaker panel, but nothing is inside the panel yet. I marked the studs by the gang boxes with what's going in them, and I have an electrical plan drawn out. The only wire that's not in a box is one coming up from the floor that's going to power the kitchen island. Without actually seeing the rooms, can anyone see anything else I should do before the inspector comes?
Acording to the residential electrical inspection checklist I have, "the rough-in must be made before the wiring is covered, and except for the final connection to switches, receptacles and lighting fixtures, all ground wires and other wires in boxes must be spliced and pigtailed for the rough-in inspection." Do the wires need to be run into the breaker panel, connected to the breakers? Is there anything I'm forgetting? Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 11-10-06, 02:54 PM
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You are best to leave all the connections at the panel not made until after the electrical rough in inspection.

I usually leave the panel connections until after I finsih installing all of the devices that are on the circuit, that way they can not be turned on by mistake and hurt someone.
 
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Old 11-10-06, 04:07 PM
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Thumbs up

Looks good from Here,
 
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Old 11-10-06, 04:10 PM
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Sounds good here also. I don't know if this is your first inspection (probably not as you're at the electrical stage now) - but - for what it's worth - Every inspector I've ever worked with on a permitted DIY project has been extremely professional, friendly, and easy to work with. If everything is "sanitary" (orderly, neat, well thought out) - then they will usually appreciate the efforts you've gone to.

Have fun - they're on your side.
 
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Old 11-10-06, 06:12 PM
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Did you crimp the grounds, just twist them? That's a common DIY mistake.

Remember, that inspector's not trying to bust your ass, he's trying to save your family's life! Don't be afraid to point out places you have questions- sure, he could fail you for something he might otherwise have missed, but better that than an unsafe situation.

Oh, and you might want to mark up inside the boxes, too, and not just on the stud- will be hard to read those notes after the drywall is up.

Good luck!!!!!
 
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Old 11-10-06, 06:18 PM
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Why crimp? "greenies" are fine. If made properly.

A handy tip: When you have sw, legs or gfi feeds, I will take a peice of the rx jacket write on it and slide it over the conductor/s.
 
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Old 11-10-06, 06:35 PM
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Well, some sort of listed connection at least. I don't think just twisting has been legal since, what, 96 or so?
 
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Old 11-10-06, 06:49 PM
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Twist with "listed connector" is fine. At least here. Can't speak for other locals.
 
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Old 11-10-06, 09:24 PM
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By twist, I assume you mean use a wire nut to connect them, and that's what I did. I didn't use the green nuts with the hole for a pigtail though, I used standard red nuts, with scraps of 12 or 14 gauge wire for the tails where necessary. Are green nuts required for the ground? I didn't use them because I had a huge bag of red ones already, but I can definitely get some and switch them out if they are code required, or crimp them. I'm already using the jacket scraps to identify what wires are what, and I used black electrical tape to re-identify the neutral wire as hot in switch loops. The inspector comes Monday at 2pm, so I have all weekend to get everything changed that might need changing. Should the wire coming from the floor for the island be stripped? Will I need another rough inspection after the island is installed and I put the boxes where they go? Maybe that's up to the individual inspector.
 
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Old 11-11-06, 09:47 AM
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Green is enforced here. Again, I can't speak on other areas.

I'ld let it go...Just don't mention it. If the AHJ picks up on it, then change. If they are reasonable it should not hold up their signature.
 
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Old 11-11-06, 10:07 AM
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Wires should not be made up in the panel..(put on breakers) however, the waire should be inside the panel. just not on the breakers. Of course local codes will preside. Here in some places you have to terminate the grounds and neutrals on the bars. Other than that the inspector shouldn't give you too much of a hassle as the switch joints will need to be made with wire-nutted grounds so the receps should be fine also. Especially for DIYers. You should know that some inspectors like to enforce there own ideas as far as the codes go. It sounds like you'll be fine but have an open mind and be sure to find out if there is a free Re-inspect should he fail you.
 
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Old 11-11-06, 01:06 PM
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I would add that you should be prepared to be flexible. Even if you fervently believe that something you did is correct but the inspector wants it done differently, think about whether or not you want to push the issue. Unless what is being told you is dangerous, you may want to go along if it does not involve too much work, so that the inspector won't get mad and really look for problems.
 
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Old 11-13-06, 03:38 PM
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Well, it looks like I got all worried over nothing. The inspector came today, looked everything over for about a minute, told me to move one wire staple that was a little too close to the edge of a stud, and passed everything. Tonight, I insulate, then hopefully start drywalling on Wednesday, but that's another forum. Thanks again to everyone for the help.
 
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Old 11-13-06, 07:10 PM
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Thumbs up Good Job.

AWESOME, Congrats. Just remember... They must find something.



The Code Panels are all Volunteers. Bless them.
 
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