GFCI 14/2 Wire Question

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  #1  
Old 11-19-06, 06:14 PM
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Arrow GFCI 14/2 Wire Question

Can I run 14/2 for gfci with a 20 amp breaker om a 50 amp sub panel, only going to have to run wire about 4 ft
 
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  #2  
Old 11-19-06, 06:18 PM
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No. A 20 amp breaker requires wire that is at least 12 gage, regardless of the distance.
 
  #3  
Old 11-19-06, 06:29 PM
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Arrow 14/2

So what is 14/2 used for then
 
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Old 11-19-06, 06:34 PM
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15 amp circuits.
 
  #5  
Old 11-20-06, 05:14 AM
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Arrow Hair Dryer

If you use this for Hair Dryer only what size breaker should you use
 
  #6  
Old 11-20-06, 05:55 AM
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That is the wrong question to ask. This implies to me a bathroom circuit. That open a whole new can of worms.

Please describe your situation in more detail for the best advice.
 
  #7  
Old 11-20-06, 10:21 AM
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Arrow More info

I have a sub panel that comes from my main box that is used for my hot water heater. We have it coming of a 50 amp in main box and then it has a 35 amp breaker in the sub. And I want to put a 20 amp in it and since it is right behing the bathroom put a GFCi and use this for when we need to run a hair dryer only. Does this make since. and is it OK for this setup
 
  #8  
Old 11-20-06, 11:20 AM
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Yes this makes sense. Since this is a bathroom you are talking about, assuming this is the US, you need a 20 amp circuit.

However, make certain that this a proper sub panel, which means it is served by FOUR wires from the main panel.
 
  #9  
Old 11-20-06, 11:26 AM
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Arrow Texas

No it has 3 which gave me the 220 how do you do a 4th wire and where does it come from on the main box.
 
  #10  
Old 11-20-06, 11:45 AM
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Most sub panels are 120/240 panels. This means they are fed with two hot wires and a neutral, and a of course a ground. This makes four wires. In some cases with outbuildings the ground and neutral can be combined, but not when the panels are in the same building.

In rare cases (highly unusual) a sub panel MAY only be 240 volts. This would be fed with two hot wires and a ground.

In some cases a sub panel may only be 120 volts. This woyld be fed with one hot wire, a neutral and a ground.
 
  #11  
Old 11-20-06, 11:54 AM
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Arrow Maybe wrong

I will have to chk when I get in from work today , But I thought I came off the 50 amp which Iput in the main and went on each side which gave me the 240 snd then grounded the other wire that was on my fed to the gound. And then when /?I came into my sub went one hot on one side and the other hot on the other side and put the ground on the ground bar I think I will have to chk, But almost sure because I dont remember a 4 th wire in my wire wher did I go wrong. Should it have been a 4 wire strain of wire instead of a three?
 
  #12  
Old 11-20-06, 12:28 PM
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If the sub panel and the main panel are in the same building then the sub panel needs to be fed with a FOUR wire feeder. The ground and the neutral MUST be separated in the sub panel.
 
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