gfci

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Old 11-20-06, 07:37 AM
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gfci

Greetings again from N.H.
-While doing our kithcen makeover with new cabinets and counter tops, we installed gfci receptacles where the older receptacles were. The older cables were still fine 12/2 NM. An electrician friend asked how I installed the new GFCI and I exlplained line to load to line to load etc. He told me to go back and pigtail each outlet on the counter top and just put the wires to the line side of each GFCI. But he did not take the time to explain why I should do this. Any Ideas?
As Always.....THANKS
 
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Old 11-20-06, 07:53 AM
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I don't know what you mean by "line to load".

The "line" terminals, a white and a black, are the power coming in to that receptacle. It is the power which goes to the actual blades of the receptacle ( through the protectice circuitry inside, of course) The "load" terminals are there, because a GFCI has the ability to protect additional receptacles down stream. You could run a white and black from the first GFCI to the white and black of one or more regular receptacles. These receptacles are now also protected by the GFCI. If a fault occurs on any part of the circuit, it trips power to all.
 
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Old 11-20-06, 07:58 AM
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I am not sure what you mean by "line to load". However I am going to guess that you connected the incoming power to the LINE terminals and the outgoing cable(s) to the LOAD terminals of each GFCI

If you made each and every receptacle a GFCI receptacle then you spent more money than you needed to.

If you used all GFCI receptacles then you only want to make your connections on the LINE side of each GFCI. Making connections on the LOAD side when the down stream receptacles are GFCI places additional levels of GFCI protection, which is not needed and may cause confusion if/when a GFCI trip occurs. You won't know if the problem is with the receptacle that tripped or with any of the downstream receptacles. You may even have multiple GFCI receptacles trip.

I suggest either one single GFCI receptacle per circuit, or that you use only the LINE terminals as your friend has suggested.
 
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Old 11-20-06, 08:01 AM
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sorry for not being more clear. By line to load I meant the first black & white from the NM going to the "line" screws (as marked on my GFCI) then the 2nd set of black & white going from the "load" as marked screws on my GFCI to the next receptacle. My friend told me to avoid using the "load" screws and use pigtails and always just use the screws marked "line".
-
thanks for your interest.
 
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Old 11-20-06, 08:03 AM
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HI Bob.....thank you. I did spend the extra $$ and instal multiple GFCI recptacles. Now I understand why he told me to use only the line side.

---Thank Again.
 
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Old 11-20-06, 08:07 AM
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Using a GFCI receptacle at each location is allowed, but not required. It does cost more. When wired properly as we discussed (using only the LINE terminals) the advantage is that you know exactly where (at which receptacle) the problem is occurred. In a kitchen this may or may not be an advantage, as all your receptacles are located close together.

Note that if your GFCI receptacles are back wire models, you may not need pigtails and wire nuts. Back wire connectors can accept two wires, so you can easily connect your incoming and outgoing wires to the LINE terminals.
 
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Old 11-21-06, 03:51 AM
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Thank you Bob.....

Great explanation and I will reconnect the wires on these today.

- N.H Bob.
 
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