Any thoughts on surge supression receptacles?

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Old 11-29-06, 08:24 PM
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Question Any thoughts on surge supression receptacles?

I'm wiring in a dedicated supply circuit for our home automation/alarm system and thought since the electronics cost a few bucks they should be protected. At some point we'll be putting in a large flat panel TV with receptacle behind it too. A plug in surge protector won't work in either situation.

Any thoughts on surge supression receptacles or surge supression breakers? Either any good? One better than the other?

Thanks guys!
 
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Old 11-29-06, 08:58 PM
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There's no reason one of these shouldn't work, but you want to make sure that it's rated for the largest surges you might expect. Consider installing primary surge suppression to absorb big surges at the main panel, and then smaller devices, like surge receptacles, at the point of use as secondary protection.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 07:09 AM
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Thanks. I'm not too knowledgeable on panel surge protection. Is that specific to the box that's installed or are they a generic retrofit? Mine is a 20 yr. old crouse hinds - out of production now.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 04:06 PM
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I use an Intermatic PanelGuard, model IG1240RC that I bought at a big box store. It's generic and should fit any panel that has space for a 2-pole breaker and some free space nearby. It sits just outside the main panel, and its wires run into the main panel to connect to ground, neutral, and a dedicted circuit breaker on each of the two hot legs.

There are others out there too, so make sure to get one that meets your specific needs.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 07:36 PM
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My $0.02:

I've got a CH panel with a CHSA surge arrester. The instructions indicate that it's most effective in the top two slots on the panel and the shorter you can cut the neutral lead, the better. Something about nanoseconds and waves, I think.

However, you might want to research "series mode" a bit to get some idea of the problems with MOV surge suppressors. Here's an old post of mine that never got a response:

http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,16752676

What I've gleaned seems to indicate that MOV isn't worthless but ultimately for very sensitive stuff that costs a lot, both might be good. For example MOV in the panel and Series mode at the receptacle.
 
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Old 12-03-06, 11:13 AM
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In principal, I don't really like the surge protector outlets.

I favor the whole home main panel types, and the point-of-use plug in kind, the latter which can easily be replaced as needed.
 
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Old 12-04-06, 12:57 PM
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Question

The receptacle type surge is rated at 740 Joules. I know that the corded plug-in units are rated much higher. Is there any baseline as to what Joule rating or clamping rating should be used?

Thanks guys!
 
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