Jump the water meter?

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Old 11-30-06, 09:29 AM
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Jump the water meter?

Ever since I got a rough inspection on part of my home re-wire project, I have wondered about the bonding of the water main pipe. Here is my situation. The water meter is about 25 feet from the edge of my attached garage, which is the part of the house nearest the street. The meter has no jumper.

When my electrician neighbor installed the new main panel with electrical meter, he said we would need a ground electrode, which he installed a few feet from the panel. I understand that more of these is better, but there is still a bare aluminum wire bonded to the copper pipe near the back of the house, about 20 feet from the panel where the wire goes to nuetral.

Do I need to jump the meter in this situation?
 
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Old 11-30-06, 09:34 AM
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> Do I need to jump the meter in this situation?

It's good idea to. The meter jumper should be there because: 1) some meters are partially or entirely plastic and break the bond, and; 2) the plumbing must remain bonded if the meter is removed for service, replacement, service shut-off, etc.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 01:03 PM
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It is required to jump the meter and any other plastic (or otherwise) fittings and such that will breaker the continuity of the piping system.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 01:15 PM
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Why?

I have done some searching on the web about jumping the water meter. It makes sense when the meter is in or near the house and the pipe is not in the ground for very long before it loses its ability to disperse a lightning strike.

But in my case, with 30 feet of pipe in the ground before the meter, why is it required to jump the water meter?
 
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Old 11-30-06, 02:21 PM
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> why is it required to jump the water meter

To bond the pipes in the house so that no one gets electrocuted if a hot wire contacts a pipe. All metal surfaces must be bonded together and bonded to the grounding system.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 05:40 PM
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30 feet

How does the jumper help prevent electrocution? Isn't 30 feet of water pipe buried in the ground enough? Here's some more fuel to the fire:

http://www.mikeholt.com/code_forum/showthread.php?t=57391&page=2
 
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Old 11-30-06, 05:49 PM
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The 30' of pipe in the ground is NOT going to open a circuit breaker. The earth does NOT provide the safety ground. The neutral to ground bond in the main service disconnect does. That is not the purpose of grounding electrodes, be they rods or pipes.

The issue is as IP stated. If you simply connected to the pipe where it enters the house and do not jump the meter, you lose the bond to the water pipes in the house if the meter is removed.

Same thing goes for plastic filters and such. Even with the meter jumpped, if you install a plastic filter housing 3' away you lose the bond to the rest of the house.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 06:52 PM
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Are you guys talking about the same thing?

The requirement for jumpering a water meter is for when the meter is inside the house or the odd case when it is just outside the foundation. A meter more than 10 feet from the house doesn't need to be jumpered.
 
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Old 11-30-06, 06:57 PM
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I don't know. I guess I am assuming the meter is in the house.

Tyger, is the meter out in the ground, or is it in the house?
 
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Old 11-30-06, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Tyger52 View Post
I have done some searching on the web about jumping the water meter. It makes sense when the meter is in or near the house and the pipe is not in the ground for very long before it loses its ability to disperse a lightning strike.

But in my case, with 30 feet of pipe in the ground before the meter, why is it required to jump the water meter?
See posts about plastic etc...


So the extra 12 inches of wire and the $2.00 clamp, are going to put you in the poor house? Or hurt someone. Your choice.

You can have a thousand feet in the ground, If the interior pipe is not bonded, You could have big problems.

I don't get this saving money thing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! You (or someone you love)
are dead, Where Is the savings!!!!!?
For CRYING OUT LOUD, DO IT RIGHT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! You aint building a race car!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And if someone was, They would probably put more care and thought into it!!!!!!!!!!!
Sorry if my frustration showed thru. Everybody looks at the buck. Some are better spent than others

Perhaps we ought look were we spend them.

Search and look for electrical accidents. (after dinner).
 
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Old 12-01-06, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by itsunclebill View Post
Are you guys talking about the same thing?

The requirement for jumpering a water meter is for when the meter is inside the house or the odd case when it is just outside the foundation. A meter more than 10 feet from the house doesn't need to be jumpered.
AGREED, most of the thread has been refering to the plumbing as it is the ground for the home. In most places this is illegal now. There is no requirement to jumper a curbside meter which is what I assume the origonal poster has. There are local codes that do not make a distinction, its just one rule fits all.
 
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Old 12-01-06, 11:22 AM
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What if there were 30 ft of plastic pipe connecting the house to the meter , are you saying you should run a 30 ft wire from the house to the meter in this case. The pipe shouldnt be used for ground. The house plumbing should be BONDED TO ground. The plumbing shouldnt be used AS ground.
 
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Old 12-01-06, 11:35 AM
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I interpret the poster to mean that the meter INSIDE the house, 30 feet from the place the pipes enter the house.

In the US when the water pipes are metal, extending at least ten feet into the ground outside the house, the pipes are considered the main grounding electrode, and are required to be connected.

In the US all other metal water pipes are to be bonded to the electrical system ground.
 
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Old 12-01-06, 02:25 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
In the US all other metal water pipes are to be bonded to the electrical system ground.

When was the requirement to bond all metal water pipes to the electrical system made effective?

My parents own a house built new in 1966, and I own houses built in 1977 and 1980, all three are in the same state, but different cities, and NONE have any attachment whatsoever to the copper piping system. Also, none of the three houses have grounding rods either. I don't know if this is something that is not enforced here in Kansas or what. I do know there are NO statewide codes.
 
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Old 12-01-06, 07:59 PM
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I do know there are NO statewide codes.


1 -National code. With state amendments (not all).


2- When was the requirement to bond all metal water pipes to the electrical system made effective?

As long as I can remember, Some may have a closer number.

3- My parents own a house built new in 1966, and I own houses built in 1977 and 1980, all three are in the same state, but different cities, and NONE have any attachment whatsoever to the copper piping system.

In your own best interest, You should have them bonded.


4- Also, none of the three houses have grounding rods either. I don't know if this is something that is not enforced here in Kansas or what.


This on the face doesn't seem right. Perhaps you haven't looked in the right place.




I'm open to input.
 
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Old 12-02-06, 01:26 PM
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For years only a water pipe was used as a grounding electrode. As long as the pipe was metallic.

For houses with well a piece of 3/4" galv pipe driven into the ground was often used as an electrode.

If you have neither it is strongly advised to correct this. At minimum bond the copper piping in the house and provide an electrode of some sort.
 
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