Gfci Kitchen

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  #1  
Old 12-11-06, 08:39 AM
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Gfci Kitchen

Greetings & Happy Holidays to come!
My kitchen counter is an exisiting 20A ckt. 12/2NM . Three recepticles on the counter top. I realize i overspent by replacing the exisiting duplex recepticles and installing each with a GFCI recepticle. I could have just done the first in ckt and saved a few $$. All kitchen counter applicances work just fine and have not had a tripped ckt.
Anyway, when I push the test button on the GFCI as part of a monthly recommended test, it works and shuts down only that recepticle which I am testing. Shouldn't it also shut down the other 2 that are downstream? At each GFCI I am only using the "line" side screws.
-Thanks
Bob in N.H.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-11-06, 09:32 AM
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No it should not. When a GFCI trips it cuts off power for that receptacle and for anything on the LOAD terminals of that receptacle. It does not (and cannot) cut off power that is feeding INTO the receptacle, which means the LINE terminals.
 
  #3  
Old 12-11-06, 09:54 AM
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follow up?

these 3 GFCI's are reading "open ground" when tested. This is a mobile home and the ckt breaker in the panel works just fine. I have gone over and over each of these 3 outlets to find a loose ground. I cannot. I have "no backstabbing" and only use the screws. My cable for this ckt traverses the underside of my mobile home and when I remove a section of skirting I do SEE a J-Box housing this ckt in the center underside . There are no other branch ckts coming from the box. They must have just run short of cable during assembly. I realize it must be permanently accessible and it probably is for a real slender electrician. However, this DIYer is not so slender. Sorry for being long winded here but here is my question.
Next to the first GFCI on my kitchen counter is a single pole light switch w/ground that sits in the same stud bay as the first GFCI outlet on the kitchen counter. Can I pigtail from the grounded green screw on the adjacent SP switch and add it to the GFCI ckt? If I can, should I make sure it is insulated green or can it be bare? I will have to pay dearly if I must access the J-box underneath the MH.
-Thanks
Bob in N.H.
 
  #4  
Old 12-11-06, 10:09 AM
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Why do you want to fix the open ground in the kitchen receptacles?

The short answer is maybe. If the circuit is only a 15 amp circuit then this ground would not be legal. If the circuit is a 20 amp circuit then the ground would be safe. Most would say it is legal, but some might say it is not.
 
  #5  
Old 12-11-06, 10:14 AM
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It is a 20A ckt. If I am "safe" with the open ground then i will leave it alone and count on the GFCI. I didn't realize it would be ok to leave alone. However, when using the little red GFCI tester it would sure look better to not see the "open ground" reading. If I decide to add the "legal" ground should it be insulated green #12 THHN?
THANKS.
 
  #6  
Old 12-11-06, 10:22 AM
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Clearly a grounded and GFCI protected receptacle is better than one that is only GFCI protected. But this only applies if your appliances are three wire.

Take a look at the kitchen appliances you use most. Only the larger ones (generally not moved) are typically three wire. Microwave and refrigerator come to mind. Most are only two wire (electric frying pan, mixer, toaster, etc.).

For two wire appliances, a grounded receptacle means nothing. For three wire receptacles, the GFCI and/or the circuit breaker will trip in the event of the appliance case becoming hot. With no ground, the GFCI will trip, but it won't trip until something, or someone completes the circuit.

Yes, go ahead and grab a ground from the nearby 20 amp circuit. Use a piece of #12 green insulated wire. It can be solid or stranded.
 

Last edited by racraft; 12-11-06 at 11:18 AM.
  #7  
Old 12-11-06, 10:54 AM
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Yes my frig is on a dedicated & grounded ckt. As well as the over the stove microwave. You explain it all perfectly. Thanks so much.
 
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Old 12-11-06, 12:23 PM
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I ran the green insulated wire and all recepticles now test fine for ground. you made me a happy camper today....thank you racraft! Makes me feel like I didn;t spend that 6 dollars for the little tester for nothing!

-Bob in N.H.
 
  #9  
Old 12-11-06, 03:28 PM
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racraft means code compliant , legal has nothing to do with electric work
 
  #10  
Old 12-11-06, 06:45 PM
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If I am reading this correctly, you snaked an insulated ground wire from one J-box to the next? I was though all wiring enclosed in walls needed some protection; i.e. conduit, AC, or romex?
 
  #11  
Old 12-12-06, 06:36 AM
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the ground wire was passed within the same exisiting stud bay. both j-boxes are located within it. it never passed thru a stud. the boxes are 8" apart.
-Bob
 
  #12  
Old 12-12-06, 06:38 AM
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A ground wire is not a current carrying conductor (except in the event of a fault, and then hopefully for a very short period of time). As such it does not need to be in conduit.
 
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Old 12-12-06, 09:54 AM
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Ok, makes sense that it's only for current carrying conductors. But I wouldn't think that current carrying conductors could be left unprotected, even in the same stud bay.
 
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