Drywall Mud and electrical wires

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  #1  
Old 12-11-06, 09:22 AM
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Question Drywall Mud and electrical wires

What is the best way to protect wires inside the box from dry wallers and dry wall mud? Is there a way to get dry wall mud of the electrical wires?

Thanks for any recommendations
 
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  #2  
Old 12-11-06, 09:25 AM
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The way to protect the wires is to be more careful with the mud. In my experience, commercial drywallers get the mud everywhere. The wires should be folded into the boxes, which helps somewhat.

You might try stuffing some newspaper into the boxes , which you can then pull out and throw away when they are done.
 
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Old 12-11-06, 09:29 AM
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A good use for those grocery store plastic bags. Or, cut pieces of cardboard to fit and use them as shields.
 
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Old 12-11-06, 09:42 AM
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I've never seen a pro not get mud all over. I'd see if you can fit some plactic wrap across - one of the big manufacturers is advertising a line that sticks to just about anything and might hold to the edge of the outlet boxes if they're telling the truth.
 
  #5  
Old 12-11-06, 09:53 AM
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Stuff some fiberglass in on top of the wires in the box there before they mud in the drywall.
Had a electrician one time years back .told the dry wall guys dont get mud in his box's they just went HA HA . Later on we had a home that had power in it. He went around and striped the wires in the boxes a little and so they didnt touch each other then turned the power on. Well mud in just one box and they didnt do that again. He never had to clean anotherbox out again. "Dont think you can do that anymore"
 
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Old 12-11-06, 10:22 AM
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He's lucky he didn't get sued..
 
  #7  
Old 12-11-06, 12:40 PM
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Thanks,
I'll try the bag trick.
Is there any way to clean off wires from the mud with damaging them?
 
  #8  
Old 12-11-06, 02:25 PM
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Just wait till it dries, then smack it your kliens , it will shatter into dust
 
  #9  
Old 12-11-06, 02:35 PM
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Three words:

Bradley Construction Blanks
 
  #10  
Old 12-11-06, 06:42 PM
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Covering boxes

I used to use cut down handibox covers to protect my wires but then I found that the dry wall guys were removing them in order to hang their drywall. I showed the G.C. my damaged wires and he refused to pay for any boards between the boxes with damaged conductors and the next box. The dry wall guys got all agitated and started making threats so the police were called and they were thrown off of the job. Next day their boss is there asking how he can get paid. The G.C. told him he would pay for the replacement boards but not the original ones and that my blank plates could not be removed. We ended up with a new drywall crew that was much more careful.
 
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Old 12-11-06, 07:54 PM
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WOW! Talk about an extreme case of drywaller/electrician animosity.
 
  #12  
Old 12-11-06, 08:16 PM
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...and then come the painters
 
  #13  
Old 12-12-06, 05:47 PM
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Smile

...and then come the painters #@!

Don't worry about that... Tapeir fix!

Those finish guys work miracles!!!!!
 
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Old 12-12-06, 08:41 PM
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You think thats extreme!

Originally Posted by Speedy Petey View Post
WOW! Talk about an extreme case of drywaller/electrician animosity.
I would call it extreme that I chased a dry waller from Connecticut Ave down into Rock creek in the District of Columbia. He was younger and faster so he is still alive. If I had caught up with him I wood have beat him to death with the three quarter inch bender I was chasing him with. The MORON's screw gun stopped working so he goes into the switch gear room and starts throwing 400 ampere Pringle switches back on hoping to reenergize the temporary panel feeder. I did have the satisfaction of learning the switch handle had broken his wrist when he tried to close it on the intentional fault of our grounding chains. The reason I was so angry was because we were inside the buildings cooling tower wrestling a new motor into place when the fault occurred a few feet away. Buy the way the switches he was throwing were four hundred and more amperes and they had been tagged out. Those old Pringles had no provision for locking them open. That's why we had chained the output to ground with locked chains. I'm sure glad that no good so and so out ran me because I think I might have killed him if i had caught him.
 
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Old 12-12-06, 08:48 PM
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Tom, You must treat them like hunting rabbits...... Sooner or later they circle back...Then.............Happy face!

another reason GROUNDS are SO important.
 
  #16  
Old 12-12-06, 09:20 PM
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I use cardboard or newspaper squares cut to fit and taped in place so that the box is sealed. After the drywall and mud slinging is done, it's easy to peel them off.

I think there is product made by 3M that is a precut, peel-off and stick tape guard designed to protect boxes. I've never used them, so I can't say whether they work well or not.
 
  #17  
Old 12-12-06, 09:36 PM
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I dont think any of the stick on are tape over the box will help much . With the routers that they use to cut out the box now. We have been fighting with them now . They nick the insulation off some of the wires in the box with it now
 
  #18  
Old 12-13-06, 06:49 PM
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Smile

Truth be told.

I have never coverd a box (except ceilings.). Either some of these people are so anal, or your plasterers are that bad.

Yes, I've had nicked wires and buried boxes. Complained aswell.
But for the most part, I must take a drywall screw out and clean the mounting hole.

Alot to do about nothing. Tuck the wires in neatly and securely, and your fine.

If they are that bad... You take a fall or two, and your ladder gashes the wall.
Framing hammers are quite handy at finding buried device boxes too.
 
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Old 12-13-06, 07:46 PM
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Framing hammers are quite handy at finding buried device boxes too.

They also help to find a tstat wire. I start about 6' away from where I think it is and do find it after many holes in the drywall
 
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Old 12-13-06, 07:47 PM
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99% of the time I can find a buried box without destroying the wall. Rarely is it the careless rush job crew that has to come back and fix the screw ups, so I do not want to give someone added work that does not deserve it.

On jobs with a lot of switches, or where I know the taping crew is either careless, green or overly quick, I use those Bradley Construction Blanks.
Yes, I do fold ALL my wires into the back of the box. Sometimes you can only get them so far.
Also, switch boxes full of mud is usually unavoidable, regardless of the crew.
These flat blanks are reusable, cheap and easy insurance against extra work I have to do.

They will not unbury a buried box though. I use a 4' level for that.
 
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Old 12-13-06, 08:10 PM
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Thumbs up

I will give the due to the rocking/taping crews!
95% are great,talented and carefull artfull aswell (how do they make it look like glass?). I beleive this to be true with all trades.

No matter what you do, you strive to do it well. (I hope).

Just couldn't help having a little fun with those watching.

We all are a team. Some play well with others, some don't.
 
  #22  
Old 01-14-07, 07:00 PM
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Stupid Drywaller

Thanks for all the replies. I taped the wires And the put some plastic bags in there for extra protection. I found out the plastic bags were making it difficult to cut out the drywall holes so the drywaller removed them. I now came across a wire that was damaged. Any tips on repair. As I see it I have probably three Options:

1. Tape over the abrassion. (If the copper isn't damaged, but I think it is.)
2. cut the damage off and connect (sodder, electrical paint tape the pieces, pig tail) (Won't really be long enough to meet code?)
3. cut in the dry wall to loosen the clamps to pull so more electrical romex cable in to the box.

What would you recommend rectify the situation.

Tough Lesson Learned: Always make sure the end is father up so if something is damaged it likely won't be to severe.

Tough Lesson Learned: Don't knock up your wife during a remoding project. You lose a worker and gain a supervisor that you are never able to please.

Get this: The drywaller kepting telling us that he was the best.
 
  #23  
Old 01-15-07, 08:44 AM
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Sounds like this advise might be a little lat for you but...
I like to leave a nice long loop of excess wire folded above and outside of every box I install.
I fold my exposed wiring neatly and deeply back into the box before the drywallers come.
If they really mud one up or nick it bad with their speed saw...
I simply scrape out the box and pull my new unexposed excess into the box and cut away the wire that was exposed in there before.
Yea...I use a foot more wire on each box I put in, but it can come in handy later when something like this happens or someone wants to move a box 6" up down or whatever!
 
  #24  
Old 01-15-07, 08:46 AM
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jn,

Your idea is not to code.
 
  #25  
Old 01-15-07, 11:52 AM
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I staple within a foot ...but push it to the max-
How is this not to code?
I have NEVER had an inspector even mention the loop.
 
  #26  
Old 01-15-07, 12:00 PM
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Since the staple must be within a foot, you cannot have an extra foot of cable looped before it enters the box.
 
  #27  
Old 01-15-07, 12:29 PM
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I think the point has been made...but to clearify:
I staple right at the top of the box just above where most people enter the box.
I put a loop up approx 5" and back down 5" and into the top of the box.
This would allow me to pull 9 or so fresh inches into the box if the drywallers mess up the original exposed wiring.
I also put a few extra inches inside the box....therefore the extra foot.
I've never regretted using a foot more wire.
I can't tell you how many times it saved destroying the drywall for a wide variety of reasons.
 
  #28  
Old 01-15-07, 02:37 PM
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I have romex cable entering a metal box so I have metal clamp that is screwed securely on the outside of the box. I don't want to fix and repair the drywall myself and I don't really want the drywaller on my new cork floor or by my new soapstone countertop. Even thoughI think I allowed for enough slack in the cable to improve the wiring situation inside the box. So If I can get one of the other options to work then that is the way I am going to go. Then when I put in a new roof or expand up I will look at it again.
 
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