kitchen remodel questions

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  #1  
Old 12-20-06, 07:47 PM
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kitchen remodel questions

I'm planning a kitchen remodel which will include wiring alterations. I know an electrician, who will provide guidance and help out. Just out of curiousity (antsy during planning), I have a few quick questions.

1) Can you go with a dedicated 15amp microwave circuit or does it have to be 20amp?

2) We plan on re-locating the stove. Can you use a junction box in the attic to extend the run, or do you have to completely rewire the circuit? If you can use junction boxes in attics, what are general rules?

3) Generally, what circuit is a garbage disposal connected to? Can you tie it into one of the 20 amp countertop circuits?

Thanks in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-20-06, 07:56 PM
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1) If you are wiring an installed microwave, such as an over-the-stove model then the directions indicate what size circuit is needed. If you are dedicating a single circuit on the counter top for the microwave, then that circuit must meet the rules of a counter top circuit. My question to you is this, if you are installing a new circuit why would you NOT make it 20 amps?

2) If the existing circuit is a four wire circuit then yiu can extend it by placing a junction box in the attic or in the basement. The junction box MUST be permanently accessible. If the circuit for the stove is a three wire circuit then you cannot extend it.

3) A garbage disposal cannot be on one of the counter top "small appliance" circuits. Either make it a dedicated circuit or tie it in with something like the dishwasher.
 
  #3  
Old 12-20-06, 09:06 PM
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The stove circuit is 40amp 2 pole. Thanks for the advice.
 
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Old 12-20-06, 09:28 PM
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#1) the cost is so insignificant, Why would you not go 20 Amp?

#2) See above. (total new run) unless you have an obserd distance to go.

#3) NO. .Counter top ckts are just that.

Again,Now you have the wire for the Microwave/hood (#12/2). where is the big deal to add this ckt? Incorporate the dishwasher with it and your good.

the cost is neglageable, do it right once!

You will be surprised, at how many people save a dollar, and spend $100. for what they want.
 
  #5  
Old 12-21-06, 12:32 PM
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must run new range four wire if it is three wire....attic okay as long as you can get to it....make garbage dispoasl 15 amp #14 gauge wire if local code allows 14....put microwave,,,regardless of where it is,,,on a #12 gauge wire and 20 amp breaker...dedecated circuit....diswasher should be separate circuit,
 
  #6  
Old 12-21-06, 01:47 PM
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> We plan on re-locating the stove.

Very few existing range circuits can be relocated safely. If the cable has only three wires or if the conductors are aluminum, the circuit must be redone completely. Three wire feeds are no longer legal, and there is no safe way to splice aluminum cable.

The cable can only be spliced and extended if the existing range cable is at least #8 and has black, red, white, and bare copper conductors.
 
  #7  
Old 12-22-06, 11:20 AM
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Thanks for all the advice. Two more questions.

1) When we rerun the range, should I upgraded to a 50amp circuit? The current one is 40amp.

2) For the 20 amp appliance circuits, I've heard it saves a little time and money to use a 12-3 cable with double pole breaker. Is this true?

Obviously, I'm not going to tackle the job by myself, but I am picking up supplies when they go on sale....hence the questions. Thanks.
 
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Old 12-22-06, 01:16 PM
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> When we rerun the range, should I upgraded to a 50amp circuit?

Few residential free-standing ranges actually require a 50A circuit. If you have a powerful one with a fast self-cleaning cycle (or intend to buy one), then an upgrade to 50A (6/3 and 50A breaker) may be prudent. If you're looking to minimize cost, then go with 8/3 and a 40A breaker. Increasing to a 50A circuit will allow the range to heat up slightly faster, but only by a percent or so at best.

> For the 20 amp appliance circuits, I've heard it saves a little time and money
> to use a 12-3 cable with double pole breaker. Is this true?

Not really. The countertop circuits require GFCI protection which can be cumbersome to provide on a multi-wire circuit. One method is to use a double pole GFCI breaker, but these are in the $60-100 range as opposed to $3.50/ea for two single pole 20A breakers and $12/ea for two GFCI receptacles.

You could run 12/3 from the breaker panel to the first receptacle and from that point split off (2) 12/2 runs with GFCI receptacles, but this method can be confusing to wire. I only recommend it if the distance from the breaker panel to the kitchen is large: about 70' or more.
 
  #9  
Old 12-22-06, 03:30 PM
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Check with local building inspector re: codes & permits & inspections and what is required by your local codes. Typically, the only time a permit is not required for a kitchen remodel is if the cabinets only are being replaced.
 
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