Basement Wiring

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  #1  
Old 12-23-06, 10:33 PM
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Basement Wiring

First post - I am doing the rough in only for electrical and I have hit a snag. I want to be sure I am correct before proceeding.

On my third circuit I want to run the following:

From Panel --> Switch (switching only the potlights)--> Potlight 1-->Potlight 2-->Receptacle 1-->Receptacle 2-->GFCI Receptacle 1-->GFCI Receptacle 2

Can I use 14/2 or 12/2 wire through the entire circuit? Is this best method or is there a better way to wire this circuit?

Thanks in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 12-24-06, 05:02 AM
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wire size

You may use either size. On lighting as you've described 14-2 is adequate as long as the load is less than 15a. But if you care to use 12-2, you should still use a 15a CB.
 
  #3  
Old 12-24-06, 06:23 AM
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If you wire it as you have stated, then using 12-2 or 14-2 will not allow continuous power to those receptacles. You will need 12-3 or 14-3 from the switch to the first light and then to the second light.

I am more concerned with WHERE in your house this is located. Please elaborate.
 
  #4  
Old 12-24-06, 10:14 AM
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This is a small room beside the rec room. There is a sink in this room, thus the GFCI receptacles. I have the option to wire two circuits here; one for the switch and the two potlights and the another for just the receptacles. Would this be the better option? 14/2 on both runs. I want to call this a kitchen type room, but that is not 100% accurate. There will be a small fridge, sink and microwave..
 
  #5  
Old 12-24-06, 10:46 AM
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What looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and smells like a duck is probably a duck.

The inspector MAY consider this a kitchen and may require two small appliance circuits and a separate lighting circuit. I would ask before I start what he or she wants to see.

It is generally a good idea to keep receptacles and lights separate, especially if this will be used similar to a kitchen, even if not absolutely required to do so. I also recommend proper counter top spacing of these receptacles, even if not absolutely required.

I would run one or two (depending on what the inspector says) 20 amp circuits for the receptacles employing GFCI protection. I would run a separate circuit for the lights. This can be 15 amp, but I prefer 20 amp.
 
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