Switching a 30 amp 250 volts to a 20 amp 120 volt outlet?

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  #1  
Old 12-31-06, 08:37 AM
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Switching a 30 amp 250 volts to a 20 amp 120 volt outlet?

We need to add a few new outlets in our basment for a new room that we are going to build. We have an old dryer outlet with its own braker that is 30 amps 250 volts. I was just wondering what we wuild need to do in order to split it up into a few new standerd outlets.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 08:39 AM
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Question

This can be done,with out too much trouble. However it may be just as easy to start at the panel.

How far away is the old dryer rec. from the panel.
Either way, you will need to change the breaker.
 
  #3  
Old 12-31-06, 08:52 AM
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Well its only one room over id say 20' away from the service panal if not less. Ya i fegured we wuild have to switch a few things on the breker its self. Where we plane to build the new room is about the same distence away from the breaker.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 09:02 AM
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So the dryer rec. and the new room are about 20' away from the panel.In the same direction?
Open ceiling? If so, not a big deal,consider new ckts.
 
  #5  
Old 12-31-06, 09:15 AM
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I can see why a person who wanted to do this work him/herself would want to use the dryer cable, instead of working in a live electrical panel. It would be easy to turn off the dryer breaker while working.

You could purchase a small (6 circuit) 60 amp panel and feed it with the current dryer cable at 30 amps, if the current cable is four wire (10/3 w/g). This would limit you on the load availabe for your new room. While by code recepticles in a house "have no load" (so you can put as many as you like on this new sub-system), in reality they do have load (and will trip if you overload them).

In addition to the drawback of having limited capacity, you will also loose the dryer rec. Someone may want to use a dryer there in the future.

If there is enough space in the main panel you are probably better off to run the cables back there. This will also save the cost of the sub-panel. You just need to be very carefull working in the main panel, and realize that there are still live parts in there when the main breaker is turned off.

The starting point for your decision needs to be deciding how much stuff will be pluged in and how many lights, etc. Do a drawing and lay out where the recs will go. Remember that the recs need to be within six feet of any door or other wall break, and a maximum of 12 apart as the wall flies. "no point, measured along the wall line may be more than 6 feet from a recepicle." "any wall space 2 foot or wider needs to have a recepticle"

Once you know how you want to lay out your new room, you can let the rest of us know. We will be able to help you more, once we have this additional information.
 
  #6  
Old 12-31-06, 09:27 AM
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Well the braker is in my shop the dryer out let is in the room next over and the new room is over to the other end of the shop forming an L.
 
  #7  
Old 12-31-06, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by jwhite View Post
Once you know how you want to lay out your new room, you can let the rest of us know. We will be able to help you more, once we have this additional information.

Well is there a way to atach a drawing to this thread?

There is alredy a celing fixtue in midel of where were going to build. So we will have to disconect that and rewire it to a new switch for that room. So we have that pluse about 4 outlets there is alredy one on a wall thats not going to be changed.

Well i hope i can ataache a pic to help out.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 10:26 AM
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This site does not allow file attachment. You can get a Photobucket account, or if you like PM me via my profile page and I will send you my private email address. (I cannot post in public due to forum policy, and would not if I could) If you send to me, I will post on my own web space for all to see.
 
  #9  
Old 12-31-06, 10:53 AM
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Well if this sketch helps any here it is.

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j188/justinhulbert/planes.jpg



If you need more detail ill make another.
 
  #10  
Old 12-31-06, 11:39 AM
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I was actually more interested in the electrical layout of the new room.

But from what I can see so far, replacing the dryer outlet is not much of a benifit.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 12:11 PM
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What do you mean "not much of a benifit". Like it wuild be beter to just disconect it from the breker and add a new breker switch for the new room.
And dose it matter how many outlets we place, what is a good amount. for a room about 12'x12'?
 
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Old 12-31-06, 12:12 PM
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I agree. No real bennefit. More of a loss. If there is room in the panel go that route.
 
  #13  
Old 12-31-06, 12:18 PM
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Well there are two spaces on the panel where you cuild add switchis but i dont know if we can acualy do that. dosent it depend on how much you are alredy using and stuff.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 12:41 PM
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You should be fine,in regards to available power.

I usualy stick with no more than 8 receptacles/ckt.
General purpose. This will depend on the use of your room and type of equipment you'll have in there. Entertainment, may want a dedicated ckt 20A.for TV game equipment etc.
As stated earlier you need a rec with in 6' of a door and then every 12' from there. This is a minnium. You can arrange it any way you like, but must first meet this requirement.
Then you must consider the amount and type of lighting.

Plan the room first, on paper,then you can move on. Do it once and do it right.
 
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Old 12-31-06, 01:07 PM
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well since its going to be a bed room there is going to need to be enuf for a computer, radio , lights that kind of stuff. So how many wuild you sujest
 
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Old 12-31-06, 01:34 PM
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Well, Now a bedroom. This makes for some special treatment, Both electricaly and from a building department stand point.Don't want to hear "no permit".
The insurance company does not either.

These ckts must or should be AFCI protected, and must have a smoke detector in it.

I'll take that back. Since we don't know where you are we can't comment on your local requirements.

Just give us the WHOLE picture,From the start.

Electricity, we're good at. Telepathy,I'm still saving up for that course.It would come in handy.
 
  #17  
Old 12-31-06, 02:03 PM
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Well I will go out on a limb.

Assuming the US, and assuming a fairly recent adoption of the NEC, you WILL need AFCI protection.

You will probably also need hardwired interconnected smoke detectors.

Finally, and probably most important, is a second means of egress. Does this new bedroom have (or will it have) an appropriate sized window leading directly outside, or will it have a door leading right outside. If not, then you will not be creating a bedroom, and you will not let anyone sleep down there. Not if you're smart anyway.
 
  #18  
Old 12-31-06, 02:57 PM
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Yes it meats egress my dad checked since he sells windows and doors for a living.
 
  #19  
Old 12-31-06, 03:00 PM
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I think i will try to contact a few old friends that are electricens since this seems to be hard to explan over the internet. But you help was vary good im now abale to consider a few diffrent ideas. And will ask yall if i have any ore Qs.
 
  #20  
Old 12-31-06, 03:04 PM
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One more comment, you will undoubtedly need more than four receptacles for that room. While you don;t have sizes on that diagram, I suspect that all the walls in that room need at least one receptacle. The only exception(s) might be the shortest walls and.or the wall where you put the door.

While the code does state within six feet from every opening, and then at least every 12 feet after that, the rule further dictates every wall space greater than a minimum size (I believe two feet) must have at least one receptacle.

Besides, you can alomost never have too many receptacles.
 
  #21  
Old 12-31-06, 03:21 PM
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The code also states that the receptacles should not be placed so as furniture (bed) will contact the cord connections. A way around this is in use covers. (Very ugly).

Again lay out the room and plan accordingly, And there should be few if any issues.
 
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