220v Electronic Timer

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-31-06, 03:44 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 106
220v Electronic Timer

I have a Tork Model 1104 wired for 240v. It is a mechanical timer with 4 connections. It works.
I decided that I wanted to be able to vary the on/off schedule and contacted Tork to determine which unit to purchase. They recommended the DTS100A.

I thought it would be as easy as to connect the new unit like the old one. However, the new unit has 10 connections.

The first 4 are easy to figure out. They are for the Timer supply with the first being N, second for 120, 3rd for 240 and 4th for 277. I connected my 2 supply wires to N and 240.

The other 6 look like:

C NO NC C NO NC

The C's are labeled L with the NO's showing Load and N

Now for the Load side. With the timer on, I do not get any power at any of these connections. I thought all I needed to do was to connect one wire from my pump to "C" and the other to the "NO" next to it. This doesn't work. Using a multimeter, I do not have power on any of these 6 connectors with the timer on.

How do I wire this? Do I need jumpers somewhere?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-31-06, 04:09 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 47
Each c(common), no(normally open), nc(normally closed) represents one switch. You have two sets of these. The switch makes contact between c and no or nc. When it makes from c to nc it will break between c and no. When it makes between c and no it will break between c ond nc.

When you apply power to one of the "C" terminals and your load to the "NO" it will switch ON when called. If you apply power to the "C" terminal and your load to the "NC" it will be energized until the clock calls and then will deenergize.
 
  #3  
Old 12-31-06, 04:15 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 106
Thanks for that information. However, I need to know where to connect the wires. I have 2 wires for the 240v. I currently have one at the N terminal for the Timer Supply and the other at the 240v terminal for the Timer supply.

Do I need to run a jumper from N (Timer Supply) to one of the C terminals and a jumper from the 240v Timer supply terminal to the other C terminal and then connect one of my pump wires to each of the NC terminals?

Currently, I don't have any power on these terminals.
 
  #4  
Old 12-31-06, 04:27 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 47
If you are switching both legs of your 240 volts then connect one wire from each leg of your supply to "C" with one wire on each "C"and connect the wires to your load onto the "NO" terminals with one load wire on each "NO". The supply terminals can be jumped from the clock power source if you want everything on the same 240 volt circuit. Or, the clockl power can be seperate from your swiching terminals.

You can also hook up the switch side to control two seperate circuits if you want to.
 
  #5  
Old 12-31-06, 04:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 106
Thanks for the further clarification. I did have a typo in my last post, I meant NO terminals but typed NC.

This timer was very expensive and I didn't want to mess it up.


>>If you are switching both legs of your 240 volts... <<

BTW, why would one only want to switch one leg of a 240v circuit?
 
  #6  
Old 12-31-06, 04:40 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 47
If you connect one side of your load to one leg constantly and then use the clock to only switch one side, you would free up the other switch to control something else. You clould use your spare contacts to even control another circuit's load since both of the clock switches are electrically isolated from each other.
 
  #7  
Old 12-31-06, 04:49 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: North of Boston, MA.
Posts: 2,113
Wink

you have 240V there now, right?
If so follow the directions. Yanici is right on.

The clock motor is 240V. But the contacts are what they call "dry". This meaning YOU must provide the power to be switched.

So connect the clock motor as you have. Then bring 1 leg (N) to "C" of 1 contact. The other leg (240) to another "C". Then 1 wire from the load to each corresponding "NO" terminal. Or "NC" as the case may be.


If you lost the diagram, here it is..http://www.tork.com/pdf49.htm
 
  #8  
Old 12-31-06, 04:55 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 106
Thanks to both of you for the information.

>>But the contacts are what they call "dry". This meaning YOU must provide the power to be switched.<<

I've never installed a timer with "dry" contacts. I've learned a lot from you guys. Thanks again!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes