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Adding 30 amp breaker to existing panel replacing 1 110v outlet

Adding 30 amp breaker to existing panel replacing 1 110v outlet

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  #1  
Old 01-01-07, 06:09 PM
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Question Adding 30 amp breaker to existing panel replacing 1 110v outlet

I want to remove one 110 volt 20 amp breaker from the main house breaker panel in the garage of my house and ad a 30 amp 2 pole breaker in the 110v breakers slot to power detached garage/wood shop about 40 feet away. My question is how do I kill the existing plug I want to kill and add the 30amp breaker for 220V (new 10-3 wire) routed over floor in attic and down the buried conduit to new subpanel in the shop ? Is this really simple to do as the main breaker is ITE stablock ?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-01-07, 07:27 PM
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I am not familiar with your panel.

With a normal panel, to put in a 240 volt breaker requires 2 slots. You cannot remove a 120 volt breaker and replace it with a 240 volt breaker unless there is an empty slot above or below the 120 volt breaker you are removing.

Adding a sub panel in a detached building is no simple task. It requires a ground rod at the sub-panel, and probably separated neutral and ground at the sub panel. I do not recommend you tackle this until you have at least read several books on wiring.

I recommend that you run regular NM cable in your house, then switch to THWN at the start of the conduit.
 
  #3  
Old 01-02-07, 06:44 AM
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Smile 220 v/110v replacement

Thanks for the info on changing the 120v breaker to 240v breaker. There is an extra 120v I can kill next to it. Do I wire nut the leads on the lines of the two 120V breakers that are killed or just pull the wires out ?

Thanks

DW Gruben
 
  #4  
Old 01-02-07, 07:25 AM
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The fact that you are asking these questions makes me think you shouldn't do this yourself. Also, it's generally required that any new circuit be inspected before being put into service.
 
  #5  
Old 01-02-07, 07:31 AM
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If you disconnect a wire from a circuit breaker, you have two options.

1) You can wire nut the wire in the panel and leave it there. If you do this, you must leave the entire circuit intact.

2) You can push the wire out of the panel and isolate it from the panel. If you do this, you must also do the same with the corresponding ground and neutral as well. Caution must be paid here. If this is a multi-wire circuit you cannot do this. Also, if this circuit passes through a junction box containing any other circuit then you must remove the wires at the junction box containing the other circuit.
 
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