splicing coaxil

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  #1  
Old 01-03-07, 08:06 AM
crm
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splicing coaxil

this is a simple thing but how is it done, I have the tools but not sure about conecting the ends to the cable,,do the thin wires get rolled back or removed?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-03-07, 08:13 AM
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Coaxial cable is spliced witha butt connector. You put a F connector on each cable and then screw them together with the butt connector.
How the F conenctor gets installed varies depending on the type you have.
 
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Old 01-03-07, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by crm View Post
this is a simple thing but how is it done, I have the tools but not sure about conecting the ends to the cable,,do the thin wires get rolled back or removed?
I would guess there's a pictorial tutorial somewhere online, but if not ...

I try to fan out the "thin" braided wires of the shield slightly and push the male F Connector down between the braided and the foil shield. If you have hand-stripped you can usually fold the braided wires back 180 degrees so they lay on top of the outer jacket. If you have a coaxial stripper you can usually roll the cable between your fingers to loosen up the braid a bit.

Push the F connector on until the foam (usually white) is flush with the inside bevel of the connector, so you have just the center conductor sticking out past that point. Crimp.

My connections only have to perform to about 600 MHz, so I have no idea how much of what I do applies past that point.

"Butt" connectors are often referred to as 'bulkhead' or 'barrel' connectors.
 
  #4  
Old 01-04-07, 03:47 PM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
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In a pinch coax can be spliced w/o connectors. Peel back the braid carefully on both ends and cut back the dielectric shorter than the braid. Leave about a half inch of center conductor exposed. Twist and solder the center conductors together and wrap the splice with electrical tape. There are two ways to deal with the braid. You can twist it and solder it together or you can pull the braid from one end over the other and wrap it tightly with tape.

I've TDR'd this type of repair and while the impedence discontinuity is evident, in most applications the insertion loss is negligible.
 
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