Bathroom circuit question

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  #1  
Old 01-04-07, 06:58 AM
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Bathroom circuit question

Greetings from balmy (so far) New Hampshire. I'm doing a bathroom makeover. My bath lights are on a ckt of thier own. I want to run a separate 20A 12-2NM ckt gfci protected to the vanity recepticle. From their I want the same ckt to power a 15minute timer switch for the wall mounted exhaust fan (fan only, no light). And finally my washing machine is also in the bathroom, so can I add the washing maching recepticle onto this circuit or am I asking for too much.
-Thanks so much
-Bob
 
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  #2  
Old 01-04-07, 07:12 AM
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Hello from equally balmy Massachusetts. The book says you'll need to run a seperate 20 amp line for your washing machine. Since it's in the bathroom it will also need to be GFCI protected.

You should be able to hook up the exhaust fan to the receptacle circuit as long as that bathroom circuit only supplies the same room and does not continue on to other bathrooms.
 
  #3  
Old 01-04-07, 07:27 AM
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I think this question is debatable.

Code requires a dedicated laundry circuit, but does not dictate that it be used.

If your house a has a laundry room (which you are using for some other purpose) and that laundry room has the dedicated laundry circuit then you already have the required laundry circuit.

However, if this bathroom is obviously intended as the laundry, in addition to it being a bathroom, then a dedicated circuit is called for.
 
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Old 01-04-07, 07:42 AM
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Thank you Bob, I'll add the separate circuit. the machine hook-ups are here in the large bathroom. So, the machine should also be GFCI protected?
Thanks.
-Bob
 
  #5  
Old 01-04-07, 07:49 AM
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This too is debatable. I think that the official answer is that the receptacle needs GFCI protection.

However, I think that an inspector might allow it to be non-GFCI if it is dedicated to the washer (and gas dryer) and is not readily accessible for anything else. A new GFCI receptacle is less susceptible to false tripping from motors than an older one.
 
  #6  
Old 01-04-07, 07:57 AM
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The GFCI is required for all 120 volt receptacles in bathroms for dwellings. There are no exceptions. Reference to 2005 NEC 210.8(A)(1). The washer receptacle needs to be GFCI in this case.
 
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Old 01-04-07, 08:01 AM
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Thank you both, that electric motor tripping the GFCI was also one of my concerns. 20A for the vanity and exhaust. And a separate 20A GFCI for the washing maching.

Many thanks to you both.
 
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