Put kitchen range vent on wrong circuit

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  #1  
Old 01-06-07, 05:40 PM
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Put kitchen range vent on wrong circuit

I updated my kitchen wiring recently (house was built in 1958), and after reading the NEC 2005 book (for another issue), I noticed that you are supposed to put the range fan/vent unit on the kitchen lighting circuit, but instead I put it on the new 20A small appliance circuit that I recently added. Oops. I swear I thought I read somewhere that you can do that, along with the gas range ignition (which I know is allowable), but apparantly not. So my question is:

1) Is this just a technical code violation, or is there some obscure safety problem here that I'm not thinking of? It's a small unit...only draws maybe 1.5 amps total. I could actually, if worse came to worse, reconfigure it so that it is on the lighting circuit, but that lighting circuit is kinda close to its max capacity, so in my mind, its probably better the way it is now. Explanations, anyone?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-06-07, 05:55 PM
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You are correct. You have a code violation. The NEC is based on safety. Every violation is a potential safety violation. Some are more serious than others.

I think that one main reason that range hoods are not allowed on this circuit is because a range hood can be a small unit, requiring little power, or it can be a monstrous unit requiring quite a bit of power. Rather than build specific power limits into the code for allowing or not allowing a range hood on these circuits, they have simply not stated anything, meaning range hoods are not allowed.

I suspect that the only risk you have, as far as the code is concerned, is that a future home buyer may want this fixed. Some home inspectors point out every little thing that is not up to current code (regardless of whether it was up to code when installed or not), and then some homeowners make an issue out of it.
 
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Old 01-06-07, 05:56 PM
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I would not call this unsafe. Sleep well.
 
  #4  
Old 01-06-07, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by lectriclee View Post
I would not call this unsafe. Sleep well.
OK, thanks...Nightie night.
 
  #5  
Old 01-06-07, 06:51 PM
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Beave, I agree with the above posters, I'm just going to give you some more information.

210.52(B) is designed to get the most bang for your buck for the dining/cooking area receptacles, that's it's goal. So, along with that comes banning any appliances that are fixed in place (aside from the fridge), to keep amps free for the portable appliances that hang out in these areas.

Also, take a look at 422.16(B)(4) in your 2005 NEC. If the hood is cord and plug connected, to be compliant with the 2005 it must be on a dedicated circuit. The reason for this is if someone upgrades to a combo microwave/hood down the road, these can be sizeable. So, your initial conclusion that "it should have been on the lighting circuit" may not have been entirely correct.
 
  #6  
Old 01-07-07, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Rocky Mountain View Post
Beave, I agree with the above posters, I'm just going to give you some more information.

210.52(B) is designed to get the most bang for your buck for the dining/cooking area receptacles, that's it's goal. So, along with that comes banning any appliances that are fixed in place (aside from the fridge), to keep amps free for the portable appliances that hang out in these areas.

Also, take a look at 422.16(B)(4) in your 2005 NEC. If the hood is cord and plug connected, to be compliant with the 2005 it must be on a dedicated circuit. The reason for this is if someone upgrades to a combo microwave/hood down the road, these can be sizeable. So, your initial conclusion that "it should have been on the lighting circuit" may not have been entirely correct.
I kinda thought that the goal of that requirement was to keep a lot of amps free, as you said. In a way though, the NEC seems to contradict itself in this regard by allowing the fridge (no slouch when it comes to consuming power) to be plugged into a small appliance circuit, rather than requiring its own dedicated circuit (though I realize most electricians HIGHLY reccomend putting it on its own dedicated circuit). I suspect some day soon the NEC will REQUIRE the fridge to be on its own circuit.

Looks like I overlooked 422.16(B)(4) also. I used a cord and plug arrangement for my range hood. Not a big deal to switch to a hardwire configuration though, thankfully. Hard to see how that restriction will really make a difference though. If a competent electrician is upgrading the standard hood to a microhood, he's going to make sure it is on its own circuit regardless of whether its plug-&-cord or hardwire. And if its a DIY homeowner doing the upgrade, they are going to most likely use the existing range hood power source, regardless of whether its hardwired or plugged in. Or am I missing something?
 
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