Bathroom wiring

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  #1  
Old 01-09-07, 11:20 PM
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Bathroom wiring

I have an unfinished basement bathroom on 20 amp circuit. Electrician who wired our basement ran wire to the switch box. In preparing to complete the bathroom, I'd like to know if my idea for completing the wiring is correct.

At the box, 1 switch for light & 1 switch for exhaust fan. Pigtail line coming into the box to feed vanity GFI. There will be another can light near the shower (approx 2 ft away). For extra protection, can I feed the can/switch from the GFI?
 
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Old 01-09-07, 11:34 PM
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Assuming the load is within limits, yes. Once the circuit is used in the fashion you describe, you cannot extend it out of the bathroom in question.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 09:45 AM
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> can light near the shower (approx 2 ft away). For extra protection, can
> I feed the can/switch from the GFI?

Yes; it may be mandatory that you do so. Lighting in and around the shower is required to be GFCI protected in many circumstances and with only 2' clearance from the shower, it's a good idea.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 02:15 PM
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Ben,

Could you post the Code section that would require the lighting to be GFI protected?

If the GFI trips you will be in the dark.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 03:02 PM
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The GFCI requirement is local, not NEC. By NEC, the only requirement is that the light fixture be rated for wet locations.

> If the GFI trips you will be in the dark

Better dark than dead I suppose.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 03:35 PM
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The OP called it 'another light'. So if only the shower light was on GFCI he would not be in the dark. He only asked about putting the shower light on the GFCI.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 04:02 PM
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I wont go into the other details about the 3' and 8' and so on....don't want to bore you with a bunch of code so I will address the GFCI question only.

Also if the fixture says listed for damp locations and has in the manufacturers verbage to be protected by GFCI then you would need to do so as the manufacturer intended. Some lights being installed within that magical 3' and 8' space could have this notice on the fixture.

For the most part, not considered needed to protect the light with the GFCI circuit...however you are well within your rights to do so if you so choose.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 09:27 PM
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Thanks for the input guys. Much appreciated. For a can ok'd for wet conditions, I might need to travel back to the store. I just picked up a regular Halo unit. I figured on buying a baffel designed for wet conditions, but if this isn't enough, thanks for the heads up.
 
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