Another 220v Euro-Appliance Question

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Old 01-10-07, 04:00 PM
S
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Question Another 220v Euro-Appliance Question

Hi all -

I've read a good bit on here today and still haven't quite gotten the answer I'm looking for.

I plan to redo my master shower and use an electronic shower control device that currently only exists for the European market (US version coming out mid 2008 I was told). Waiting til then isn't an option so here's the product specs

Supply voltage: 230 V (3 A fused spur, 2 metres cable supplied fitted to Base Unit)
Type of protection (Base Unit): IP X4

I plan to contact the company w.r.t. the 50vs60 clock freq issue so lets assume this is a non-issue. I also understand the IP protection info - note that this product is generally mounted in the wall behind the shower...

What's the best method to get power to my new device?

(1) New 220 breaker from main (this appears to be against code due to the to the low wattage?) however, I'm not sure if this device is "cord and plug" - see http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=182160&highlight=220v

NOTE that I got lost in the specifics of this thread

(2) Tap existing 220 line from dryer (as it works out, it is directly underneath the room I need to feed - funny how that works huh?) This appears to be a no-no too...

(3) A step up transformer - this is least desirable due to constant electrical draw, noise, heat, etc.

Any other method I've overlooked? I'm not an electrician but I pretend to be an engineer in real life

Thx for consuming my entire workday today with reading about 220...
scoot
 
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Old 01-10-07, 04:48 PM
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A European 220v circuit may (not sure) consist of one hot wire and one grounded neutral. A US 240V circuit consists of two hot wires. Lots of potential for a fatality that only an engineer with a through knowledge of the product could comment on. Combining this uncertainty with water and metal pipes is a very bad idea IMHO.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 08:18 PM
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Haha - Thx for the input Ray!

The product isn't required to be mounted behind the shower but is obviously designed for it. I'd planned to mount the product in an existing dead space that houses a plumbing vent.

Would the 'bad idea' part just be mixing electric/water/metal or specifically mixing 240 electric with no neutral with water/metal?

If the non-neutral is the issue then a step up seems to be the best solution, right?

I need to call across the pond to get some further info it appears...
 
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Old 01-11-07, 04:04 AM
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A quick example. In the US 120V lamp socket (should) have the shell portion hooked to the neutral side. and tab at the bottom to hot. If you should be grounded when replacing a bulb and touch the shell there is under normal conditions no risk. If on the other hand you had a European 220V lamp and put it on a US 240V circuit with two hots the shell would have 120V to ground, potentialy dangerous.

The other problem is neutrals aren't usually on a switch. If the unit uses a single pole switch which is common when one leg is neutral then you'd still have a hot leg on a US circuit even in the off position.

An isolation transformer, which is what you are suggesting, might make it safer but again no way to be sure.
 
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