Adapter needed for NEMA 6-20P plug

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  #1  
Old 01-22-07, 10:45 AM
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Adapter needed for NEMA 6-20P plug

I just received a 30 amp 240v portable heater for my garage. I already have a 30 amp 220/240 outlet that my air compressor runs on. However, the compressor outlet takes a clothes dryer-type plug and my heater's plug is a NEMA 6-20P. Is there an adapter available that will allow me to use the NEMA plug w/o having to call an electrician back out to the house and install another outlet?
Please excuse my ignorance in describing what I have and need. I'm a complete electrical doofus.
Many Thanks,
Jim
 
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  #2  
Old 01-22-07, 12:58 PM
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Upon Further Review.................

I went back to the ebay seller's listing I bought the heater from and he lists the plug type as a 20 amp.
So it looks like I'll have to have that electrician back out anyway, unless someone can convince me otherwise.
Again, Many Thanks for any input.
Jim
 
  #3  
Old 01-22-07, 01:02 PM
jn
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Depending on the "Dryer" outlet in your garage it is probably either a :
NEMA 10-30R (3 wire) or a 14-30R (4 wire)
What you would be looking for is an extention cord that has a NEMA (10 or 14)-30P to plug into your existing outlet in the wall and a NEMA 6-20R for your new heater to plug into on the other end.
I would think this would be hard to find and relatively expensive.
You may want to ask your electrician to quote making or finding you a cord and have him quote placing a new and proper outlet. Keep in mind you wont be able to run the air compressor and heater at the same time if you use the adapter cord.

By the way...NEMA 6-20 is 20AMP. I'm not sure why this would be on a 30 amp 240v portable heater, but that's another story...

Here is a link to NEMA outlet pictures to help you identify what you need.

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.yung-li.com.tw/images/cat2002/yp16.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.yung-li.com.tw/EN/products/heavyduty_nema.htm&h=189&w=250&sz=20&hl=en&start=2&tbnid=hDnqnry2P4LukM:&tbnh=84&tbnw=111&prev=/images%3Fq%3DNEMA%2B6-20P%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26sa%3DG
 
  #4  
Old 01-22-07, 01:16 PM
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It would be very unsafe to make an adapter which would allow you to run a 20A appliance on a 30A circuit. This would create a situation where the heater could overload and catch on fire without the breaker tripping. I do recommend that you have your electrician install a new circuit that is sized correctly for your heater.
 
  #5  
Old 01-22-07, 01:48 PM
jn
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inline4,
Your second post came while I was responding.
Since the heater really is 20 AMP I totally agree that the best thing for you to do is have the proper sized outlet installed.
The items needed are relatively common and depending on your particular set up / situation, shouldn't be too difficult or expensive to accomplish.

ipbooks...I agree with you to a point with your comments, but I also would like to make the statement that most items that are normally plugged in and portable anywhere in your home are not even close to matching the circuit that supplies them.
Example: Table lamp with one 60 watt bulb max. Internal wiring 20 gauge plugged into a 20 AMP circuit breaker wired with 12 gauge.
I'm not looking for an arguement, just making a statement and at the same time totally agreeing with you in this instance. We would not want to be making adapters that can result in an unsafe situation.
 
  #6  
Old 01-22-07, 01:53 PM
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Thanks for everyones' replies. I sincerely appreciate them.
I'm about to call an electrician and have the job done right. Believe it or not, I'm pretty anal about having things done correctly the first time. I was simply in too much of a hurry to get my garage heated and was looking for shortcuts.
Again thank you for your replies.
Jim
 
  #7  
Old 01-22-07, 02:05 PM
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> most items that are normally plugged in and portable anywhere in your
> home are not even close to matching the circuit that supplies them.
> Example: Table lamp with one 60 watt bulb max.

The very important difference is that those appliances (such as table lamps) have been UL tested for safety on standard 15A and 20A circuits. A 20A heater would not have been certified for safe operation on a 30A circuit.

There are a few other appliances that are certified for multiple amperages, such as an electric range which may be used on a 40A or 50A circuit. Portable heaters, however, do not carry such a certification -- the circuit should match the appliance.
 
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Old 01-22-07, 05:44 PM
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"I'm about to call an electrician and have the job done right."

Wise decision !!



"I was simply in too much of a hurry to get my garage heated and was looking for shortcuts."


This certainly could get things heated up fast. Including the areas you were'nt intending on heating!

Always match the ckts to the equipment.
 
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