wiring finished attached garage

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  #1  
Old 01-27-07, 08:25 PM
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wiring finished attached garage

I am going to need to rewire my garage since now it has one outlet and one light in it and both of those are wired off my living room circuit breaker. They actually have a tiny 20 year old extension cord going from the outlet stapled up the wall across the ceiling to run the garage door opener. My idea was to add 2 new 20 amp breakers to my main panel, run wire across my basement ceiling (40 feet) to where the garage attaches. 1 circuit for 5 fluorescent lights and the door opener and the other for about 4 20amp outlets. My questions are do I need to install a subpanel or can I just use a junction box? What size wire do I need to run from the main box to the garage connection(40 feet)? Can I use 12/2 indoor romex inside 1/2" emt pipe and attach it to the outside of the drywall? Should I use 1/2" pipe or 3/4"?
 
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Old 01-27-07, 08:46 PM
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first, eliminate the extension from the other room.

Treat the garage as an entire new area. Run a 20A ckt for the doors and a rec. or two. If you have space in the panel run another 20A ckt.

1) all recepticales in the garage MUST be GFCI protected. With the exception of the door openers.

You can run The NM (romex) through the house to a 4+11/16 junction box. Then use 1/2" conduit in the garage. I would use THH/WN in the pipe not Nm cable.
 
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Old 01-27-07, 09:35 PM
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Should I use 12/2 romex from the main to the junction box? Why not use the romex inside the pipe? I have a big roll of 12/2 indoor romex that is why I wanted to use it. How many regular outlets can I run off of the GFCI outlet?
 
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Old 01-27-07, 10:04 PM
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You should use 12/2/wg for a 20 amp ckt from the panel to the garage junction box. From there you should use 1/2" EMT with THHN or THWN. Do not use NM-B inside of conduit as this is not allowed by code being as it double insulates the cable casuing heat build up. (thus the code) everything else sounds ok..Good luck
 
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Old 01-27-07, 10:35 PM
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to add to lee's great advice, all 'general use' receptacles must be GFCI protected. Receptaces located overhead, such as those that serve the garage door opener, or behind appliances, such as referigerators, do not and proabably should not, need to be GFCI protected.

If your garage is also your laundry area, then you need a seperate 20A circuit that can only serve the washer/dryer (assuming your dryer is 120V).
 
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Old 01-28-07, 07:48 AM
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While I do not recommend using NM cable in conduit, it is not against code and you are free to do so so if you want. However, you will find it difficult to pull through conduit, especially half inch conduit.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 05:58 PM
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I agree.....use at least 3/4 conduit. No problems there. I would design the 2 circuits as follows: use one circuit for the door opener <dedicated> and use the other circuit for the lights and receptacles.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:08 PM
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Why not 1-ckt for doors and lights? This leaves the other ckt dedicated for the power tools.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:16 PM
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If you have receptacles connected to a garage door opener circuit, you're already starting with a pretty high-amp motor on the receptacle circuit. Depending on the amps of the motor, you might trip the circuit if you're working and someone hits the opener. If you keep all the receptacles on one circuit, you won't have to worry about it, unless you're running more than one thing at a time. If you're planning on using multiple tools at once, then by all means, split up the receptacles on 2 circuits.....just remember which receptacles are which circuit. Either/or, I just prefer to keep motor circuits by themselves when possible.
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:21 PM
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I just prefer to keep motor circuits by themselves when possible.#

This makes perfect sence.

For the draw on a garage door,The lights should be fine.Then you have the full 20A available for tools and vacuumes etc..
 
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Old 01-28-07, 06:35 PM
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Sounds like a winner.
 
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