220 to 110

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Old 01-31-07, 09:05 AM
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220 to 110

I know nothing about electrical wiring so here goes.
I have a 220 cook top, the receptical has 2 black wires, 1 white, 1 red and 1 bradded bare cable. My question is, can I use a combination of these wires to create a 110 circuit so I can mount a 110 box in the same area? Thank you in advance for the information. Geo
 
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Old 01-31-07, 09:25 AM
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No. The problem is that the overcurrent protection (i.e., breaker) for the cooktop is too large for a general use 120-volt circuit. Even if you could mount a subpanel in the area, the existing circuit is sized specifically for the cooktop, and is not sufficient to add other loads.

A new circuit from the main panel is probably easier to run than you think.
 
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Old 01-31-07, 02:46 PM
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I kind of figured that, it's not my property, the property owner remover the old built-in cooktop oven combo which had the oven on top and is replacing it with a regular stove(oven on the bottom) and wants to install a microwave/range hood combo in the space where the oven was. It is in an old appartment building converted to condos, he is on the second floor and the wall where the outlet needs to be installed is ceramic tile except behind where the old stove was, oh well, maybe there is access to something on the other side of the wall. Thanks for the info. Geo
 
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Old 01-31-07, 03:23 PM
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> old built-in cooktop oven combo which had the oven on top and is replacing
> it with a regular stove(oven on the bottom)

Make sure the existing circuit is heavy enough for a freestanding range. Many built-in cooktops are only supplied with 30A. A freestanding range requires a minimum of 40A (large or fancy units require 50A). If you only have a 30A circuit, a new circuit will need to be installed for the range.

> microwave/range hood combo

Every single one of these that I have ever seen requires a dedicated 120V 20A circuit installed new specifically for the appliance.
 
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Old 01-31-07, 06:44 PM
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You don't own the building, you can do nothing.

An electrician may be able to use the wires for a regular receptacle, or even two, by replacing the circuit breaker wiring properly. I say electrician because you don't want the landlord doing the work, and you cannot, and you want it done properly.
 
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Old 01-31-07, 07:39 PM
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Thanks to everyone, as of this post I have "washed my hands" of the project, some times I get sucked in, however, with the help of the posters on this site, I get saved from time to time and this is obviously one of those times. Thanks, and have a nice day. Geo
 
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