125 or 100 Amp Load Center?

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Old 01-31-07, 07:05 PM
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125 or 100 Amp Load Center?

I am in the planning stages of rewiring an older home, ca 1890. With 100 amp entry power, is it wise to put in a 125 amp or 100 amp load center? Nothing unusual will be in the house: just standard wiring which will include supporting one 220 volt line for a dryer; kitchen appliances are standard refrigerator and dishwasher. No electric tools or shop equipment (they are in my shop which has a separate entry and with a 125 amp load center).
 
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Old 01-31-07, 07:11 PM
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Are you referring to the main panel? You will not likely find a 125 amp main breaker panel. 100, 150 and 200 are the "standard" sizes for residential installations.
Panels will be rated 125 amps, but this is the maximum rating. It can still be a 100 amp main panel.

If it were me I would upgrade to 200 amps. If you are re-wiring to code you will most likely need the breaker space, and if the home is on the large side you may need bigger than 100 due to the demand load.
 
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Old 01-31-07, 07:20 PM
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I agree totally. A 200A service is the way to go....shouldn't even cost much more, and you'll have plenty of power available. What type of heating does the home have?
 
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Old 02-01-07, 03:47 AM
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If I had a 200 amp load center I'd have to have 200 amp service coming in, no...wouldn't I have to install a new load center and have a 200 amp meter and line installed?

The house is heated with wood backed up with an oil-fired furnace.
 
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Old 02-01-07, 04:22 AM
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Yes, the whole service would have to be 200 amps. A small portion of a complete remodel IMO.

I'm not sure, but I do not think wood can "legally" be the main source of heat. I believe you need a full source of heat as a backup, which I assume your furnace is.
Not really an issue as the service goes. An oil furnace does not really draw much.
 
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