Proper Circuit Layout

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  #1  
Old 02-07-07, 05:50 AM
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Proper Circuit Layout

I'm remodeling two bathrooms-- and the house was not wired with dedicated circuits to these bathrooms (nor are they GFCI). The loads are shared with adjoining bedrooms and hallway.

The proposed electrical plan include:
Master Bath:
3- Can Lights
1- Shower Light
1- Fan
2- Sconce
1- Vanity Light
1- Recepticle

2nd Bath:
2- Can Lights
1- Shower Light
1- Fan
2- Sconce
1- Vanity Light
1- Recepticle

Can someone offer me some sound advice on properly planning the layout for the circuits in these bathrooms.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-07-07, 06:04 AM
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Layout

Post a diagram of the room layout showing the location of all the power wires furnishing power, each switch, each light, each heater, each fan, and each receptacle.
 
  #3  
Old 02-07-07, 06:43 AM
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I'd would love to but this forum won't allow me to post an attachment??
 
  #4  
Old 02-07-07, 06:59 AM
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Diagram

Use a photo sharing site such as Photobucket and give us the address.
 
  #5  
Old 02-07-07, 07:09 AM
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Use one 20 amp circuit per bathroom. Use the least amount of wire you can. Use #12 wire.
 
  #6  
Old 02-07-07, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by joed View Post
Use one 20 amp circuit per bathroom. Use the least amount of wire you can. Use #12 wire.
Should I use GFCI breakers or just the GFCI recepticle?
 
  #7  
Old 02-07-07, 08:00 AM
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A GFCI receptacle is much cheaper, easier to reset, and does the same job. Use whichever you want (but for most people, the receptacle is a slam dunk).
 
  #8  
Old 02-07-07, 08:03 AM
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Easy enough. Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 02-07-07, 10:05 AM
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Check the installation instructions on your shower light fixture; some manufacturers require the fixture to have GFCI protection. If so, you'll want to make sure the shower light is wired downstream from the GFCI receptacle to take advantage of its protection.

My personal preference is to make shower lights GFCI protected even if not required.

Also, install 12/3 cable (instead of 12/2) between the exhaust fan and the switch box if the fan has a built-in light and you want to control the fan and light with separate switches.
 
  #10  
Old 02-07-07, 10:15 AM
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Ben, excellent point.
I'll go lights first, then GFCI recepticle, then shower light. That way, if the GFCI trips, the bathroom doesn't go black.

The fan doesn't have a light- so 12/2 will work fine.

Joe
 
  #11  
Old 02-07-07, 11:17 AM
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Just to throw in another suggestion:

Though it's code-compliant to run each bathroom off it's own 20A circuit (not connected to anything else), you may want to consider doing the following:

one 20A circuit for receptacles in bathroom #1
one 20A circuit for receptacles in bathroom #2
one 15A (or 20A) circuit for lighting and fans in both bathrooms

Depending on your family, you won't notice the lights dim when the hair dryers are turned on, and you have enough power to deal with 2 hairdryers (or whatever) running at the same time.

Just something to consider.
-Mike
 
  #12  
Old 02-07-07, 11:22 AM
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Excellent point. I'll consider this.

Joe
 
  #13  
Old 02-07-07, 06:59 PM
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I would use 12-3 for the fan. You never know when you or someone else in the future will want to make that a fan/light combo.
 
  #14  
Old 02-08-07, 02:04 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
I would use 12-3 for the fan. You never know when you or someone else in the future will want to make that a fan/light combo.
I agree, I always like to plan for the future. It cost a little up front but is a lot cheaper later.
 
  #15  
Old 02-09-07, 04:51 AM
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Another question:
I want to put the switch for the shower light relatively close to the shower. Is there a minimum distance from the shower code requires the switch to be located?

Thanks,
Joe
 
  #16  
Old 02-09-07, 06:08 AM
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If it can be reached from within the shower then it MUST be GFCI protected.
 
  #17  
Old 02-09-07, 08:35 AM
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I think that question has a different answer in Canada than it does in the U.S. We don't know where Captain Jack is.
 
  #18  
Old 02-09-07, 08:43 AM
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Regardless of whether or not the switch is required by code to be GFCI protected, I would definitely do so if the switch is close enough to be reached while in the shower.
 
  #19  
Old 02-09-07, 08:47 AM
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I matey, the captain is in the US.
 
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