Is Summer Heat Bad for J Boxes in Attic

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  #1  
Old 02-07-07, 08:09 PM
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Unhappy Is Summer Heat Bad for J Boxes in Attic

OK. I was just at the 'mega home repair store'. The electrical guy there told me that j boxes in the attic can overheat causing the elec to overheat and catch on fire. hummmmmm is this true?

My issue is that this is a very small OLD 800 sq ft | 2 bdrm | 1 bath home where all elec outlets are tubed to the ceiling and all meet in the attic. I've run 12 gauge wire from outside main panel to attic where there would be many j boxes upon completion. I was doing like for like and in the middle of it all. What do you suggest or have an ideas? I also have 220 to laundary room and outside roof AC | Heating unit. It appears there's only one 220 breaker which the dryer is hooked to currently.

A sub panel outside with metal tubing run to it from the main box
and break out sheet rock and rewire? HELP!
 
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  #2  
Old 02-07-07, 08:18 PM
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That story is ridiculous. Junction boxes in the attic are fine.

However, very old wiring has very old insulation that has been made brittle by years of overloading.

I can't really comment further because you didn't describe the scope or reason or goals for your project.
 
  #3  
Old 02-07-07, 09:48 PM
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.... I thought so....

Ye ole mega hardware store. I miss the old ones....you could by some great stuff and had the right answers.

I'm redoing my home and the wiring was a mess (I love clean wire). Just replacing like for like with fishhooking method. The problem is the wires meet in the attic and need j boxes that weren't really there.

There are:
4 wires coming from the living room to the attic,
4 florscent ceiling lights, 3 plugs and 2 switch from kitchen to the attic,
4 plugs, 1 ceiling light and 2 switches from a bedroom
3 outlets, 1 switch and 1 ceiling light from another bedroom
bathroom has 1 switch and 2 plugs
laundry has 1 ceiling and 1 switch.
Plus the 220 which i undertand needs to be continous to main box.

How do i j box these wires?! That it's up to calif code.

Thanks so very much!
 
  #4  
Old 02-08-07, 05:25 AM
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Are you doing a complete remodel of the entire house or just replacing the wiring? In either case, I believe that you may have to bring the electrical system up to code. Just a few examples: AFCI breakers for bedroom circuits, receptacle spacing with 6/12 rule, 20A circuit for the bathroom, 20A circuit for the laundry, (2) 20A circuits for the kitchen receptacles w/ proper spacing, hardwired smoke detectors, etc.

Because of the new requirements, a one-for-one replacement of the existing wires is probably not correct. Perhaps a book which covers a house re-wire is appropriate; it would be impossible to list everything you need to know here.
 
  #5  
Old 02-08-07, 07:39 AM
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Most books on home wiring cover how to use junction boxes: where to put them, how to secure them, how to secure the cable to them, how to secure the cable to the house, how to strip the cable sheathing, how to strip wires, how to use wire nuts, etc. You'll not only need the basic home wiring books, but you'll probably need some advanced ones as well because of the scope of your project.

As ibpooks said, it would be a shame to merely replace like for like. If you're going to all this work, there are so many valuable and worthwhile improvements you can and should (and probably must) make.
 
  #6  
Old 02-08-07, 07:54 AM
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Wiring, plugs and lighting

Hi, Thank you so much for your info. I'll get a book. Any suggestions of a book would be well received. I will address these issues as code is import.

I do not want to tear out walls hopefully. It's all worth it. It will be cute when done and most importantly safe.
 
  #7  
Old 02-08-07, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson View Post
Most books on home wiring cover how to use junction boxes: where to put them, how to secure them, how to secure the cable to them, how to secure the cable to the house, how to strip the cable sheathing, how to strip wires, how to use wire nuts, etc. You'll not only need the basic home wiring books, but you'll probably need some advanced ones as well because of the scope of your project.

As ibpooks said, it would be a shame to merely replace like for like. If you're going to all this work, there are so many valuable and worthwhile improvements you can and should (and probably must) make.
The book Wiring Simplified is a good resource and you can check codes online for free now at
http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.asp?categoryID=860&itemID=21227&URL=Publications/necdigest/Review%20the%20NECģ%20online&cookie%5Ftest=1

Be glad you can pull romex, I'm in Chicagoland and so it's conduit everywhere.
 
  #8  
Old 02-08-07, 05:05 PM
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Use no more "J" boxes than you need. These are potential problems waiting to happen.

Go from device to device when ever possible.

Catch up on the code requirements, save your self a hassle later.
 
  #9  
Old 02-09-07, 06:22 AM
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Why is a j box a "problem waiting to happen"? I'm not trying to be a smarta** but I've got a half dozen j boxes in my attic. They've been there for 20 years. I used j-boxes when remodeling because it was a lot easier than running new wiring from the basement to the 2nd floor bedrooms.
I don't understand why a j box would be any more unreliable than any other properly made up connection.

Am I missing something?
 
  #10  
Old 02-09-07, 06:58 AM
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Every place on a circuit where wires are joined or connected to a device or appliance is a potential failure point. You have no choice at receptacles, switches and appliances, you have to make a connection. However, when you make a connection in an attic, crawl space or other location junction box, you run the risk, whatever it is large or small, that the connection will fail. When the junction box is not easily seen, or where itís exact location may be forgotten, it becomes harder to find.
 
  #11  
Old 02-09-07, 07:29 AM
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The Fine Art of Electrics

OK guys....got a book. It's going to be simple with a lot of work but worth it. I've been exposed to fire before and I'd do anything to have clean j box free wire from what I've learned!

The base boards are already off. Will remove wall board at bottom and wire thru the studs. The existing tubes the wiring is thru is used for grounding which I can place 12 gauge thru it but faced with j boxes in the attic...no way! A little cutting and plastering will be better.

May even run a sub panel for the back of the house. Nice clean new wire up to code. Sleeping at night is a beautiful thing

Thanks for your support
 
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