Gas Rangetop and Fridge on same circuit. Problemo?

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Old 02-10-07, 06:56 PM
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Gas Rangetop and Fridge on same circuit. Problemo?

I want to put a gas rangetop and fridge on the same circuit. All the installation manuals state to put the appliance on a dedicated circuit. I am tight on CB space, so I want to double up on some of these where it makes sense. These are not high draw electrical appliances (not like a garbage disposal or trash compactor) so I'd like to combine them. Is there electrical code that requires them to be on a separate circuit? Or is there some other higher reason for manufacturers to put this in their installation guidelines?
 
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Old 02-10-07, 07:09 PM
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Not ideal, But just fine to do.
 
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Old 02-10-07, 07:42 PM
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If the installation manual calls for a dedicated circuit then a dedicated circuit is required. However, I would be surprised if that were the case.
 
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Old 02-10-07, 07:50 PM
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I agree. After all, what are you drawing? A quartz piezo ignitor and a clock??
 
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Old 02-10-07, 10:43 PM
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Gas range instructions usually word the dedicated circuit as recommended, so this allows you to have a little flexibility. You shouldn't have any problem with what you want to do and frankly if this range is a plug in cord for a 15 amp circuit I dont know too many electricians that would use up a 15 amp breaker on just a gas range.

Roger
 
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Old 02-12-07, 12:42 PM
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One thing to consider, is that some gas ranges have electric warming drawers. I had a GE gas range that had an 8 or 9 amp draw, and therefore specified a 15A dedicated circuit. Still doesn't mean it _needs_ one, but it's more understandable than just a clock and piezo igniter.
 
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Old 02-12-07, 07:41 PM
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The appliance is a 48" Wolf Rangetop, which means the controls are on the front, like a standard range, but only burners/griddle/etc. on top - no drawers or ovens. Looking at the spec, on one page is the "Electrical Supply Requirements" which calls out a dedicated 15 A circuit, but on another page of Installation Notes it states "the service should have its own 15 amp circuit breaker." So its probably not required, just a good practice. It is just for the piezoelectric start, and shouldn't be on a GFCI (or AFCI, I'd imagine.)

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-12-07, 08:10 PM
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You should be fine. I did not take into consideration of the options that others have ( MY bad).

These appliances have come a long way, So I will ammend my comment.

Check your specs and wire accordingly.

I will in the future.
 
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