Static Electricity & Thermostat?

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  #1  
Old 02-16-07, 09:27 AM
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Static Electricity & Thermostat?

Hello Everyone:
When I want to change the temperature on the house thermostat (honeywell) I get a spark and just now it destroyed my settings but the thermostat itself seems to be ok, I am going to reset everything!
What I would like to know, how can I avoid getting that static when I touch it.
Would standing on a rubber mat or tapping tin foil to it help???

What can I do to avoid this sudden spark?? Thanks, Tom
 
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Old 02-16-07, 09:36 AM
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Rubber mat is not the answer. The static charge is on your clothing and body. It is looking for a path to ground. Raising the humidity in to house would be a big help. Otherwise, touch the face plate scews on a nearby light swtich first, to discharge yourself, before adjusting the T-stat.
 
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Old 02-16-07, 09:40 AM
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There are numerous ways to reduce or eliminate static shocks within your residence. I am sure you can google the term static electricity and learn all about it.

Some suggestions:

Make your house wetter (add moisture to the air). Add a humidifier. Add an aquarium or other device with water in it.

Remove the carpeting from your house.

Change what you wear on your feet.

Touch something else grounded first, before touching your thermostat. Items include a properly grounded screw on a switch or receptacle plate, or a water pipe or plumbing fixture.
 
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Old 02-16-07, 09:40 AM
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> When I want to change the temperature on the house thermostat
> (honeywell) I get a spark

Every time you touch it? What part of the thermostat is metal? Does anything else in the room spark when you touch it? Is it a problem that just started or has happened for a long time?

> how can I avoid getting that static when I touch it.

I'm not convinced it is static electricity. If it sparks you every time, you may have some improper wiring which has energized the thermostat.
 
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Old 02-16-07, 10:04 AM
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I was told to put more humidity in the house before, I do have a humidifier connected to the heater in the basement.
I could (if remembering) to touch the light switch first, its next to the thermostat
I taped a piece of Tin Foil to the thermostat, but I guess thats stupid, Right?
I was told by a friend that it may ruin a chip inside the thermostat, if I am not carefull, is this true?
 
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Old 02-16-07, 10:09 AM
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I'm not sure if I would call taping a piece of aluminum foil to the thermostat "stupid", but it certainly won't help.

A humidifier connected to your furnace does very little. You need a large floor humidifier, one that you have to add gallons of water to each day.

Yes, static electricity (which can be thousands of volts) can damage integrated circuits and other components. The fact that the thermostat lost it's memory is evidence of this.
 
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Old 02-16-07, 10:20 AM
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How about Anti Static spray can, if I spray it on the rug in front of the thermostat???
 
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Old 02-16-07, 04:45 PM
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Boil a soup pot full of water on your stove tonight and watch this problem go away for a couple of hours.

Although the lightning bolt you are throwing at your thermostat is electrical in nature it is your home's heating sytem that needs to be tuned up in order to fix this problem.
Not only will a spark scramble a stats programing, it can also damage its processor.
A console humidifier will work but if you are in a fairly cold climate you will need to be filling it up too often for it to be practical.
If you have forced air heat you really need to have a furnace mounted humidifier.

You say you have a humidifier connected to your heater, I assume you mean to your furnace.
I will take a wild guess and say it is either an old plate or a drum style connected to the ductwork.
Have you done any maintenance on it like cleaning or pad replacement?
There is a problem with some bypass type humidifiers where the furnace does not run enough to get the humidity up to the proper level.

Describe your heating system and what make and model your humidifier is......maybe we can help.
You also should really pick up a digital hygrometer to be able to measure the humidity level.
 
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Old 02-16-07, 06:12 PM
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GregH: Will get back to you with the info next week, will be away from my pc for the weekend. Thanks
 
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Old 02-16-07, 06:29 PM
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Good thought

TOMTOM,
GregH and I have disagreed on issues before. However i feel He is right on with this(as others aswell). You have a humidity problem. You did not reveal your location, so we must assume your in a cold dry climate.

This will create your symptons. When I had the FHA system, I installed a humidistat, 1- out side, 1- in side. Not sure of the terms. It was an "April air" product, piped into my water system, and automaticaly adjusted when the furnace ran. A Great investment!

If you have a humidfier now, and it is over 10 yrs old. Remove it and go for the new style. You won't regret it.

By the way.. If you have nylon wall plates and nylon screws in them.. That won't help grounding to them.
Grounding straps only help with a ground. Discharge to something else.
 
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