Need bigger fuse.

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  #1  
Old 02-27-07, 10:09 AM
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Need bigger fuse.

I recently bought a table saw that needs a 20A breaker/fuse. I'm still a little nervous because everyone says NEVER replace a fuse with a larger one but I think I've done my homework on this one.

The saw was served by a 14ga circuit containing a 15A S-type fuse.
I rewired the circuit with 12ga wire. Is this all I need to do?

How do I remove an S-Type fuse adapter? I am thinking about just crushing it with needle nose.

Are there any other concerns about doing this now that I have the proper gauge wire? Specifically I'm a little concerned about starting a fire in the fuse panel even though the fuse was properly sized for the rest of the circuit.
 
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  #2  
Old 02-27-07, 05:01 PM
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DO NOT attempt to remove the adpator on the fuse box very few electrician do have this specail gimzo that can remove the adpator..

better choice is either upgrade the fuse box to breaker or make a subpanel

majorty of them will be wise to just get new breaker box to jusify the cost and also have more room to expand in future

Merci , Marc
 
  #3  
Old 02-27-07, 06:35 PM
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Bad Idea

Don't even try! Most likely you'll loose that spot forever.
Go with a small sub or as suggested upgrade the panel.
 
  #4  
Old 02-28-07, 04:24 AM
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As the others suggested, it is not worth even trying.
There is a little pin that sticks out of the side of screw shell. This pin is reverse facing, so it will scrape as it is screwed in, but will dig in and NOT scrape if the adapter is attempted to be removed.
If this makes any sense.
 
  #5  
Old 02-28-07, 07:32 AM
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I have read elsewhere that I can simply crush in the adapter with needle nose pliers or a punch. This will bring the pin toward the center of the adapter and allow me to either unscrew it or just pull the adapter straight out. I think I could do it as it is just a thin piece of brass. Has anyone attempted this? If you have attempted this please let me know how it went.

Any responses to the other part of my question about other hazards that I may not have thought of?
 
  #6  
Old 02-28-07, 10:21 AM
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""I have read elsewhere that I can simply crush in the adapter with needle nose pliers or a punch. This will bring the pin toward the center of the adapter and allow me to either unscrew it or just pull the adapter straight out. I think I could do it as it is just a thin piece of brass. Has anyone attempted this? If you have attempted this please let me know how it went.""


OH MOI DIEU !!!!


I going to repeat this one again please DO NOT i say again do not do this one at all.

i did work on quite old fuse box and what you describing you are endangering yourself and the fuse box as well

you have to understand that even you remove the main fuse but here a catch if someone told ya about removing this adpator gotta be pretty crazy because the screw shell is the load connection and the center button is line connection and what will happend that if you do that you will end up destory that socket or worst the fuse will not function at all or will short out if any metal peice fall behind the fuse socket,


as i will repet this again better off replace the fuse box with breaker box or add subfeed box that will give you more room and additional circuits as well.


as again whatever that site told you or a person whom told you that is very wrong idea to deal with it

and what more majorty of fuse box are 30 + years old and over the time it can loose up alot and there is too many things can go wrong with fuse box if you dont understand the safety here

Merci , Marc
 
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Old 02-28-07, 06:56 PM
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Are You Plugged In?

Originally Posted by paintchips View Post
I have read elsewhere that I can simply crush in the adapter with needle nose pliers or a punch. This will bring the pin toward the center of the adapter and allow me to either unscrew it or just pull the adapter straight out. I think I could do it as it is just a thin piece of brass. Has anyone attempted this? If you have attempted this please let me know how it went.

Any responses to the other part of my question about other hazards that I may not have thought of?

I have read of people getting killed and then comming back. And suing the the people that told them to try it.

Take the advice.. OR move along. If your a FOOL, be your own fool. Leave the good people out of it.

PS: Stop eating those PAINT CHIPS!!!! Trust me, Nothing good comes from it.
I say this with respect. (CYA)
 
  #8  
Old 03-05-07, 09:07 AM
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Well

I've solved my own problem here.

I still can't believe I'm the first reader of this forum who has rewired a circuit with the intent of increasing amperage only to find themselves in this same situation. No one has tried (successfully or unsuccessfully) to remove an S-Type fuse adapter?
 
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Old 03-05-07, 09:38 AM
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Well if you just have to try to remove the insert first replace the fuse box with a new breaker box. Then when the new breaker box is all hooked up and the fuse box is removed, laying on your work bench, connected to nothing try it.

Not being exactly humorous here. I had an old Zinsco box, no main breaker, I couldn't figure out how to get the breakers out of. A friend, an electrician, said they are sometimes held in by a metal bar you basically have to cold chisel the end off. Couldn't believe it. There was no way to do it safely. Surely they would have provided a way to easily replace the breakers. After I had replaced the box with a new one I began experimenting on the Zinsco box and found he was right. Sometimes there just isn't a way.

Sometimes the writers of help books such as you read have no experience in what they are writing about. They just set at their desk and research what others have written and who knows if the ones they used for their sources really learned from experience or not. If you read a lot of how-to books on a subject you will begin to see how similar most are. Almost as if everyone was copying from the same source. If your experienced in a particular procedure you will also see the same errors sometimes repeated over and over.
 
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Old 03-05-07, 08:28 PM
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Wink Congrats!

Originally Posted by paintchips View Post
I've solved my own problem here.

I still can't believe I'm the first reader of this forum who has rewired a circuit with the intent of increasing amperage only to find themselves in this same situation. No one has tried (successfully or unsuccessfully) to remove an S-Type fuse adapter?
--I've solved my own problem here.----

We're very happy for you. Glad you could post back.

----I still can't believe I'm the first reader of this forum who has rewired a circuit with the intent of increasing amperage-----

Your not. Nor are you the first that has been advised not to do it the way you intended. Because it's [EDIT] ill-advised.


--No one has tried (successfully or unsuccessfully) to remove an S-Type fuse adapter?[/QUOTE]---

Yes, on BOTH acounts. Some say it's easy, some can't speak.

As Nice and respectfully as I can:

I'm glad it worked out for you. I think you were [EDIT] unwise for trying it.
I also think you got great advice here. You played the odds. You won.

Don't be mad at us. How many "Ugly stories" or real life disasters have you seen(heard or witnessed) in this trade?

It aint trivial! If it were, You would'nt have to ask.

Keep smiling - I Thought "stupid" was apropriate, Given the thread direction. Also I have seen moderators use it in the same context. Not to be edited.
 

Last edited by lectriclee; 03-07-07 at 06:49 PM. Reason: Add My thought: To make A SERIOUS POINT.
  #11  
Old 03-07-07, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by lectriclee View Post
You played the odds. You won.
Just to be clear, I did not remove the adapter. No odds were played, but I still won.
 
  #12  
Old 03-07-07, 01:50 PM
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So don't keep us in the dark. What did you do?
 
  #13  
Old 03-07-07, 07:00 PM
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Keep it in context!!!

John, Thanks for your concern. I do realize your spot. And you all do a good job. Keep it up.

Paint Chips: I know your not dumb. But your post sounded like you made a dumb move. Against good advice, and that, in any normal eye would be "stupid". Call em' as you see em'.

So what did you do. You led us on.. Don't leave us hanging.

I am glad it worked out and none got hurt. (thats' always good).
 
  #14  
Old 03-08-07, 10:40 AM
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Speaking of stupid.

I feel kind of stupid for not realizing the solution before I posted. But if you really must know.....

Turns out my breaker box had an empty circuit (my fuse box is a subpanel of the breaker box). So I created a new circuit with three duplexes on it to serve the table saw. The new circuit is protected by a 20amp breaker and run with about 20 feet of 12-2 romex. The old circuit is still 12-2 protected by the 15amp fuse but now has three fewer outlets on it.
 
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